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Can anyone please tell me how to find out the N th largest entry from a table in oracle?

Like for largest we can use MAX(column_name) is there any efficient way to find nth largest also?

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9 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted
SELECT *
FROM (
  SELECT some_column, 
         row_number() over (order by your_sort_column desc) as row_num
) t
WHERE row_num = 3


If you expect more than one row to have the same value in your_sort_column you can also use the rank() function

SELECT *
FROM (
  SELECT some_column, 
         rank() over (order by your_sort_column desc) as row_rank
) t
WHERE row_rank = 3
This migh return more than one row..

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+1: Only caveat is analytic functions are supported on 9i+. And DENSE_RANK might be a better choice than RANK, depending on needs. –  OMG Ponies Dec 19 '10 at 19:28
    
Not true. Analytical functions were available in 8i: download.oracle.com/docs/cd/A87860_01/doc/server.817/a85397/…. But 8i and 9i are de-supported anyway. So there is no reason to post answers covering those versions if not explicitely mentioned –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 19 '10 at 21:18
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you can find the nth largest value of column by using the following query

SELECT * FROM TableName a WHERE 
n = (SELECT count(DISTINCT(b.ColumnName))
FROM TableName b WHERE a.ColumnName <=b.ColumnName);
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I think the below query will work to find second highest record with NOT IN .

SELECT MAX( userId )FROM table WHERE userId NOT IN (SELECT MAX( userId )FROM table)

simple and useful...

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To get second largest salary use this:

select salary from 
  (select s2.salary,rownum rm from
     (select distinct salary from employees order by salary desc)
  s2 where rownum<=2)
where rm >= 2
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works perfectly but still I am not understand why query is not working after modifying like below MODIFIED: select s2.salary,rownum rm from (select distinct salary from employees order by salary desc) s2 where rm<=2 –  Abilash Nov 26 '12 at 5:27
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it works for second highest salary

$query = “SELECT * FROM table_name ORDER BY field_name` DESC LIMIT 1 , 1 “;

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Apparently there are multiple ways which you can find here and here

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The first link is ok, but the second one is awful. Using a hierarchical query for this would be incredibly slow and confusing. –  jonearles Dec 19 '10 at 15:06
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SELECT DISTINCT (a.sal) FROM EMP A WHERE &N = (
  SELECT COUNT (DISTINCT (b.sal)) FROM EMP B WHERE a.sal<=b.sal
);

Replace &N with you desired number. For example, 2 will give you the second largest salary.

If you are using PL/SQL, just execute the statement. It will prompt for N.

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SELECT Sal FROM Tab ORDER BY Sal DESC LIMIT 2,1

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You can ORDER BY column name and then LIMIT 1,1 to get the second one

edit

Whoops, didn't see the Oracle tag, sorry.
ORDER BY column name WHERE ROWNUM = 2 should work better.

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Oracle doesn't support LIMIT. –  Ronnis Dec 19 '10 at 14:27
    
@Ronnis whooops you're right, updated answer –  Agos Dec 19 '10 at 14:32
2  
"WHERE ROWNUM = 2" will never return any rows. –  jonearles Dec 19 '10 at 14:58
    
@jonearles why wouldn't it? –  Agos Dec 19 '10 at 16:16
1  
From download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/…: "Conditions testing for ROWNUM values greater than a positive integer are always false." You have to alias ROWNUM and then use that alias instead of ROWNUM. –  jonearles Dec 19 '10 at 17:48
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