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I want to display whether two String objects changed or not. How do you think following code? I guss it is not so bad. But I wonder if another approach might be more sophisticated.

EXPECTED RESULT
--------------------------
1:changed
2:changed
3:changed
--------------------------

package com.javastudy;

public class StringCompareBeforeToAfter {

 private static boolean isChanged(String before, String after) {
  if(before != null && after == null || before == null && after != null){
   return true;
  }
  if(before != null && !before.equals(after)){
   return true;
  }
  return false;
 }

 public static void main(String[] args) {

  String before1 = null;
  String after1 = "a";

  if(isChanged(before1, after1)){
   System.out.println("1:changed");
  }

  String before2 = "a";
  String after2 = null;

  if(isChanged(before2, after2)){
   System.out.println("2:changed");
  }

  String before3 = "a";
  String after3 = "b";

  if(isChanged(before3, after3)){
   System.out.println("3:changed");
  }

  String before4 = null;
  String after4 = null;

  if(isChanged(before4, after4)){
   System.out.println("4:changed");
  }

  String before5 = "a";
  String after5 = "a";

  if(isChanged(before5, after5)){
   System.out.println("5:changed");
  }
 }

}
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This seems a mite simpler

private static boolean isChanged(String before, String after) {
    if (before == null) {
        return after == null;
    } else {
        return before.equals(after);
    }
}

You can also change signature to objects and use method in general case.

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1  
+1. Technically speaking the else statement is redudant. –  thkala Dec 19 '10 at 14:15
    
Thank you very much indeed! It is more sophisticated clearly. –  zono Dec 19 '10 at 14:17
    
@thkala That's a matter of taste, I suppose. Although if we were aiming for the shortest code, you would be right. –  Nikita Rybak Dec 19 '10 at 14:29
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Or even the shorter.

public static boolean isEquals(Object a, Object b) {
    return a == b || (a != null && a.equals(b));
}

public static void main(String... args) {
  String[][] beforeAfter = {
    { null, "a" },
    { "a", null },
    { "a", "b" },
    { null, null },
    { "a", "a" },
  }

  for(String[] test: beforeAfter) 
    System.out.println("isEquals("+test[0]+","+test[1]+")= "
                      + isEquals(test[0], test[1]));
}
share|improve this answer
    
shorter != simpler :) But nice example anyway. –  Nikita Rybak Dec 19 '10 at 14:30
    
wow! it is only one-line.. Thanks a lot. –  zono Dec 19 '10 at 14:37
    
@Nikita, I would say shorter != clearer. You should do what you feel is clearer first. But you need to know what the options are to know what you think is clearer. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 19 '10 at 18:26
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