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I use lstat to take a file`s characteristics, but it doesn't appear to work, it returns -1 and the error -No such file or directory-.

I try the path in the shell, typing :

:~$ ls /home/mypc/Desktop/file.c
/home/mypc/Desktop/file.c

So this path obviously works with ls, but not with lstat ! It is very weird. This is the line in which I call lstat:

int i=lstat(path, &buff );

path is a char[] and buff is a struct stat object.

Please if you have any ideas...

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3  
Probably, your path is wrong. Let us see how do you set it. –  andcoz Dec 19 '10 at 15:30
1  
printf("%s\n",path) ; before you stat it to see what path is set to. –  Noufal Ibrahim Dec 19 '10 at 15:40
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You can also use strace, ktrace, ktruss or truss (whichever is available on your platform) to see what exactly happens. –  Roland Illig Dec 19 '10 at 15:51
    
I do it with fgets,that is right.the problem is that i don t know a perfect way to put the path I get from fgets in a char foo[],and then in lstat. I tried to do it even with getcwd but it wont work.can someone write an example with getcwd ,with the path given by fgets and with lstat? thnx –  thanos Dec 19 '10 at 17:17
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4 Answers

This is correct behavior. Your path doesn't exist.

From the documentation:

RETURN VALUES Upon successful completion a value of 0 is returned. Otherwise, a value of -1 is returned and errno is set to indicate the error.

As @Noufal states, you can try printing the path. It may be that your path has a \n appended to it; this is likely if you read it with fgets.

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I do it with fgets,that is right.the problem is that i don t know a perfect way to put the path I get from fgets in a char foo[],and then in lstat. I tried to do it even with getcwd but it wont work.can someone write an example with getcwd ,with the path given by fgets and with lstat? thnx –  thanos Dec 19 '10 at 17:13
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From fgets manual page: If a newline is read, it is stored into the buffer.

So you are trying to lstat /path/yourfile.c\n. Obviously you file name is yourfile.c and not yourfile.c\n.

more explanations added

Your "path file" is something like /path/to/yourfile.c\n/other/path/to/otherfile.txt\n. The file "uses" \n (new line) characters to separate the different entries in the file.

When you read it using fgets, the path variable is filled, each time, with a full line read from the "path file" including the ending \n character. So if you look inside your program memory, you'll discover that path looks like /path/to/yourfile.c\n\0somegarbage (after the first call to fgets).

Now, you have to get rid of the trailing \n, just before the \0 that identifies the end of the string.
As you wrote in one of the comments,you can use memset to do this but, IMHO, there are easier ways.

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so how do I delete the \0 ? with memset for example? : memset(&path[last_element], 0, sizeof(char)); is this right? –  thanos Dec 19 '10 at 23:38
    
No, do not delete the '\0'. You have to delete the '\n' before the '\0'. Ok, I'll edit the answer –  andcoz Dec 20 '10 at 0:31
    
there is a \n before the \0 ??? first time I hear this. So, if I have a string, what do i have to do to it to pass it in lstat? if you can please give an example as you said.thanx ! –  thanos Dec 20 '10 at 0:36
    
Thanx!Thanx!Thanx!Thanx! i did it.it was so simple. thank you;) –  thanos Dec 20 '10 at 0:58
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First and foremost, look at the error value. The path may exist, but be otherwise reachable.

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Thank you for your answer. It is right that I use fgets to read a line from a pipe that gives me the paths. The problem is not that the files is unreacheable for sure,because I checked this. the problem is the path itself.I do:

while ( (fgets ( path, 512, f ) )) {//path name is f.e.: ./.local/share/Trash/files/myFile.c
       struct stat buff;
       //here I have the path and I give it in lstat
       if(lstat(&path[1], &buff )==0){ //I give path[1] and not path[0] to avoid the dot in the begining
       }
}

the error must be the pathname.

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You'd not create an answer to add new details. Instead you can edit the question. In any case, please, format the code using the markdown syntax. –  andcoz Dec 19 '10 at 20:57
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