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How can I get a count of the total number of digits of a number in C#? For example, the number 887979789 has 9 digits.

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4  
try using .Length if it doesn't work convert it to a string first –  Breezer Dec 19 '10 at 16:40

11 Answers 11

up vote 48 down vote accepted

Without converting to a string you could try:

Math.Ceiling(Math.Log10(n));

Correction following ysap's comment:

Math.Floor(Math.Log10(n) + 1);
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2  
I'm afraid ceil(log10(10)) = ceil(1) = 1, and not 2 as it should be for this question! –  ysap Dec 19 '10 at 18:08
    
You're right. I should be rounding up rather than down. Thanks. –  Steve Dec 19 '10 at 18:26
    
Thanks, it's a nice method. Though it's not any faster than int count = 0; do { count++; } while ((i /= 10) >= 1); :( –  Puterdo Borato May 12 '12 at 18:25
1  
If your number range includes negatives, you'll need to use Math.Floor(Math.Log10(Math.Abs(n)) + 1); –  mrcrowl Jun 6 '12 at 3:35
4  
hmm fails when n = 0, -1, 0.1 etc.. –  nawfal Dec 14 '12 at 13:45

Try This:

myint.ToString().Length

Does that work ?

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Hand't realized this was homework...oh well! Hopefully you can see why that works! –  Andiih Dec 19 '10 at 16:41
    
this work,thanks –  Arash Dec 19 '10 at 16:47
10  
It's worth pointing out that you'll likely run into problems with this method if you're dealing with negative numbers. (And obviously decimals, but the example uses an int, so I assume that's not an issue.) –  Cody Gray Dec 19 '10 at 16:52

Not directly C#, but the formula is: n = floor(log10(x)+1)

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1  
log10(0) is -infinity –  Klaus Jun 3 at 5:29
    
@Klaus - log10(0) is actually undefined. But, you are correct in that it is a special case that need to be tested for and treated separately. This is also true for any non positive integer number. See comments to Steve's answer. –  ysap Jun 3 at 11:50

There's an interesting article on dotnetpearls about just this.

This is based on the premis that you don't want to convert the number to a string first.

There may be a more elegant way of doing this and I'll update my answer as I think of one.

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static void Main(string[] args)
{
    long blah = 20948230498204;
    Console.WriteLine(blah.ToString().Length);
}
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dividing a number by 10 will give you the left most digit then doing a mod 10 on the number gives the number without the first digit and repeat that till you have all the digits

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int i = 855865264;
int NumLen = i.ToString().Length;
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1  
fails for negative int, and for numbers like 23.00. Do a string.TrimStart('-') better –  nawfal Dec 14 '12 at 10:19

Answers already here work for unsigned integers, but I have not found good solutions for getting number of digits from decimals and doubles.

public static int Length(double number)
{
    number = Math.Abs(number);
    int length = 1;
    while ((number /= 10) >= 1)
        length++;
    return length;
}
//number of digits in 0 = 1,
//number of digits in 22.1 = 2,
//number of digits in -23 = 2

You may change input type from double to decimal if precision matters, but decimal has a limit too.

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It depends what exactly you want to do with digiths. You can iterate by number digits starting from the last one to first one this way:

int tmp=number;
int lastDigith = 0;
do
{
    lastDigith = tmp/10;
    doSomethingWithDigith(lastDigith);
    tmp %= 10;
}while(tmp!=0);
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If its only for validating you could do: 887979789 > 99999999

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Using recursion (sometimes asked on interviews)

public int CountDigits(int number)
{
    // In case of negative numbers
    number = Math.Abs(number);

    if (number >= 10)
        return CountDigits(number / 10) + 1;
    return 1;
 }
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