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I'm trying to get quoted parameters of a bash script to safely be received by a nested script. Any ideas?

test.sh

#!/bin/bash
echo $*
bash myecho.sh $*

myecho.sh

#!/bin/bash
 echo $1
 echo $2
 echo $3
 echo $4

Sample:

bash test.sh aaa bbb '"ccc ddd"'

Result:

aaa bbb "ccc ddd"
aaa
bbb
"ccc
ddd"

Wanted result

aaa bbb "ccc ddd"
aaa
bbb
ccc ddd
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I was just about to ask that question! Good timing. –  Scottie T Jan 15 '09 at 21:01
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3 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted
#!/bin/bash
echo $*
bash myecho.sh "$@"

Note the "$@" construct is not bash specific and should work with any POSIX shell (it does with dash at least). Note also that given the output you want, you don't need the extra level of quoting at all. I.E. just call the above script like:

./test.sh 1 2 "3 4"
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"$@" works with any Bourne shell or Bourne shell derivative (from 1978 onwards), including Korn and Bash. Probably 95% of the time, using "$@" is correct and $* is wrong. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 16 '09 at 8:03
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You want to use "$@" (quoted dollar at) to pass parameters to a subscript. Like so ....

ls-color.sh:

#!/bin/bash
/bin/ls --color=auto "$@"    # passes though all CLI-args to 'ls'


As to why.....

From the Bash man page:

$* -- Expands to the positional parameters, starting from one. When the expansion occurs within double quotes, it expands to a single word with the value of each parameter separated by the first character of the IFS special variable. That is, "$*" is equivalent to "$1c$2c...", where c is the first character of the value of the IFS variable. If IFS is unset, the parameters are separated by spaces. If IFS is null, the parameters are joined without intervening separators.

$@ -- Expands to the positional parameters, starting from one. When the expansion occurs within double quotes, each parameter expands to a separate word. That is, "$@" is equivalent to "$1" "$2" ... If the double-quoted expansion occurs within a word, the expansion of the first parameter is joined with the beginning part of the original word, and the expansion of the last parameter is joined with the last part of the original word. When there are no positional parameters, "$@" and $@ expand to nothing (i.e., they are removed).


Setting up some demo scripts ...

echo 'echo -e "$$1=$1\n$$2=$2\n$$3=$3\n$$4=$4"' > echo-params.sh
echo './echo-params.sh $*' > dollar-star.sh
echo './echo-params.sh $@' > dollar-at.sh
echo './echo-params.sh "$*"' > quote-dollar-star.sh
echo './echo-params.sh "$@"' > quote-dollar-at.sh
chmod +x *.sh

./echo-params.sh aaa "bb bb" '"ccc ddd"'
  # $1= aaa
  # $2= bb bb
  # $3= "ccc ddd"
  # $4=

$* / $@ - outside of quotes, will strip one level of escaping off the arguments (rarely what you intended):

./dollar-star.sh aaa "bb bb" '"ccc ddd"'
  # $1= aaa
  # $2= bb                  
  # $3= bb
  # $4= "ccc
./dollar-at.sh aaa "bb bb" '"ccc ddd"'
  # $1= aaa
  # $2= bb
  # $3= bb
  # $4= "ccc

"$*" - inside quotes, smashes the args into a single string (~2% of the time you actually want this behavior):

./quote-dollar-star.sh aaa "bb bb" '"ccc ddd"'
  # $1= aaa bb bb "ccc ddd"   
  # $2=                     
  # $3=             
  # $4=

"$@" - inside quotes, becomes an identity transform for re-passing args to a subshell (~98% of the time, this is what you meant to do):

./quote-dollar-at.sh aaa "bb bb" '"ccc ddd"'
  # $1= aaa
  # $2= bb bb             
  # $3= "ccc ddd"  
  # $4=
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6  
+1 for explaining why $@ is preferable to $* –  chepner Jan 22 '12 at 16:09
    
Thanks for the explanation. Just used "$*" for grep alias. –  darkless Dec 5 '13 at 12:25
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The answers above are really, really good.
My only point of clarification would be that "$*" is probably what you want more like ~0.2% of the time.

I write a lot of shell scripts, and I only now ran into the first case where this is true.
Observe the difference in behavior between these two scripts.
Try with something like: (Although the last one will still need to be quoted for &, %, etc., and ? in fish.)

./script wherewith whence wherefore
./script wherewith "from whence" wherefore
./script wherewith https://whence.whence/~whence?whence=whence wherefore

This doesn't work reliably, because it's being over expanded (line three):

#!/usr/bin/env sh
printf(){ command printf "$@"; }
print(){ [ x"$@" != x ] && [ -c /dev/stdin ] && printf "$@\n" || printf "$@"; }
with=$1; for where; do :; done; what="$(print "$@" | sed "s|^$with \(.*\) $where$|\1|")"
print "$with $what $where"

But this does:

#!/usr/bin/env sh
printf(){ command printf "$@"; }
print(){ [ x"$*" != x ] && [ -c /dev/stdin ] && printf "$@\n" || printf "$@"; }
with=$1; for where; do :; done; what="$(print "$*" | sed "s|^$with \(.*\) $where$|\1|")"
print "$with $what $where"  

With comments (because its kind of gibberish without them):

#!/usr/bin/env sh # This script is trying *absurdy hard* to be portable.
# Works in (at least): sh, bash, dash, zsh, ksh, mksh, pdksh...
# Splits command line into three variables, first, last, and everything else.  

# Something you might do because builtins are buggy/unreliable.
printf(){
   command printf "$@"
  }

# Same reason (i.e. to avoid 'echo'), and to avoid echoing newlines to stdout.
print(){
  [ x"$*" != x ] && [ -c /dev/stdin ] && printf "$@\n" || printf "$@"
 }

# Maybe a subcommand.
with=$1

# Maybe a directory. (Neat little trick to grab the last argument to a script or function.)
for where; do :; done

# Maybe a URI or another path.
what="$(print "$*" | sed "s|^$with \(.*\) $where$|\1|")"


print "" # Nothing.
print "$with"; print "$what"; print "$where"

# Or, portably create a tempfile.
temporary="/tmp/$(od -XN4 -An /dev/random | sed 's| ||g')"    
print "$with $what $where" > $temporary
cat $temporary
rm $temporary
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