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Quick question. I love emacs. I hate typing stuff though, so I like to use e to invoke emacs.

Previously I had my .bash_profile (OS X) configured as: alias e="emacs .". However, I was tired of still having to type emacs {file} when I just wanted to edit one file.

So I tried to whip this up, from some googling, but bash is complaining about the []:

###smart emacs, open file, or if none, dir 
e()
{
    if [$1]; then
        emacs $1
    else
        emacs .
    fi
}

I want to use this to do: e something.c or, just e.

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1  
[ is a command. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 19 '10 at 17:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#!/bin/bash                       

###smart emacs, open file, or if none, dir
e()
{
    if [[ -z "$1" ]]; then # if "$1" is empty
        emacs .
    else
        emacs "$1"
    fi
}
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thanks! But why the double [[ ]] ? –  Josh Dec 19 '10 at 17:23
    
@Josh the single [ is actually a command, if you type which [ you'll probably get back a path like /usr/bin/[. This is why you need a space after the [. The [[ syntax is an improvement over [ in that it lets you use logical operators inside such as &&, ||, or ==. Type help [ to see more. –  SiegeX Dec 19 '10 at 17:27
    
Ah. I'll read up on that! What does the -z flag do? And must the $1 be in ""? I have another set up as py(){ python $1 } and it doesn't seem to complain. –  Josh Dec 19 '10 at 17:29
    
@Josh type help test to see the list of flags. -z checks to see if the parameter in question is NULL –  SiegeX Dec 19 '10 at 17:36
    
-z is "check if argument is length 0". In this particular case, leaving off the " " might not hurt, but it's not something you should get in the habit of, because the quotes keep filenames with spaces intact. (Think of parameters as textual substitution, not formal parameter passing the way programming languages do.) –  Ulrich Schwarz Dec 19 '10 at 17:39

Try

if [ $# -ge 1 ]; then
  emacs "$@"

I think bash is very peculiar about spaces. I'm even surprised you're allowed to omit a space between function name and (). (Also, using $@ should open all files you pass.)

ETA: better check against number of arguments, in case of e "" foo.txt...

share|improve this answer
    
Is $@ different from $* ? –  Josh Dec 19 '10 at 17:24
    
Is that read as, if the number of arguments ($# ?) is greater than, or equal to 1, then open them all? Sorry if this is obvious, I'm quite new to bash functions. –  Josh Dec 19 '10 at 17:26
    
@Josh: I was fearing that question... the difference is (I believe) that with $*, e foo bar would open "foo bar" and $@ would open foo and bar, i.e. the splitting into seperate words. A fuller explanation is here: tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/internalvariables.html –  Ulrich Schwarz Dec 19 '10 at 17:29
    
@Josh: yes, it is. Spaces and quotes in filenames make me avoid touching them wherever possible. –  Ulrich Schwarz Dec 19 '10 at 17:30
    
Ah, great! Last-ish question, why the "" around $@? I see that page says you /should/ use them on $@, but you /must/ use them on $* . Why is that? –  Josh Dec 19 '10 at 17:33

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