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I am trying to create a program in which you can create, log in, and delete accounts. I have made 2 lists, one with usernames and one with passwords. The script asks for an input and if you say log in, it says:

if loginchoice=='login':
    choice = raw_input("What is your username? ")
    choice2 = raw_input("What is your password? ")
    if choice in accounts:
        option1=1
    else:
        option1=0
    if choice2 in password:
        option2=1
    else:
        option2=0
    if option1==1 and option2==1:
        print "Welcome to Telemology,", choice
    else:
        print "The username or password you entered is incorrect. Please try again or register."

As you can see, it only checks to see if the inputs are already in the lists. It doesn't see if the inputs have the same index. I can't put "accounts.index(choice)" because it treats 'choice' as an integer. The same goes for quotations because of strings. It doesn't treat them as variables. Is there any way around this?

I hope that if my question gets answered, two people won't register simultaneously and glitch the indices.

share|improve this question

Create one list of users instead, and create User objects, which have username and password as attributes.

Having two lists is going to get desynchronized sooner or later.

share|improve this answer

What you want is a mapping, or a dictionary. Its key would be username, its contents the password for that username.

users = {} # this is the mapping
users["joe"] = "123" # it currently contains username "joe" with password "123"
...
username = raw_input("What is your username? ")
password = raw_input("What is your password? ")
if username in users.keys():
  expected_password = users[username]
  if expected_password == password:
    print "Welcome to Telemology,", username
  else:
    print "Didn't you forget your password,", username
else:
  print "Unknown user"

Of course, in a real system you'd store passwords salted and encrypted.

share|improve this answer

Since it is login, it should be unique, and you can make a dictionary:

users = {'username':'password', ...}

and then check like this:

choice = raw_input("What is your username? ")
choice2 = raw_input("What is your password? ")
if (choice in users) and (choice2 == users[choice]):
   # valid user
else:
   # login or password incorrect.
share|improve this answer
    
Just in case: docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#dict.has_key :) – user225312 Dec 19 '10 at 18:37
1  
@sukhbir Thanks, updated. – khachik Dec 19 '10 at 18:39

Some problems I'm seeing:

  1. You're displaying the password that the user types.
  2. You'll accept any username and any password, meaning I could log in to any account with my password.
  3. Never store a cleartext password.

I haven't found the portable way to not echo passwords. #2 is solved with a dictionary. As for #3, you'll probably want to use the hashlib module:

from hashlib import sha224

PASSWORD_HASHES = {}

def set_password(account, raw_password):
    PASSWORD_HASHES[account] = sha224(raw_password).digest()

def authenticate(account, raw_password):
    if account not in PASSWORD_HASHES:
        return False
    return PASSWORD_HASHES[account] == sha224(raw_password).digest()

Replace sha224 with whatever hash algorithm you want; I haven't kept track of which ones are still good for passwords.

EDIT: Regarding problem #1, if you're running a POSIX-based system (i.e. not at a Windows prompt), you can use some example code from Python's page for the termios module to get a password without echoing it to the screen:

def getpass(prompt="Password: "):
    import termios, sys
    fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
    old = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
    new = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
    new[3] = new[3] & ~termios.ECHO          # lflags
    try:
        termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, new)
        passwd = raw_input(prompt)
    finally:
        termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, old)
    return passwd

This doesn't put *'s up for the characters; it just suppresses input. To put up *'s, you have to handle input one character at a time and write more code.

share|improve this answer
2  
There's a getpass function in the standard library, and it should be portable: docs.python.org/library/getpass.html – Thomas K Dec 19 '10 at 21:17

Or you could just SQLite3 db. That will allow you to add users and password on runtime. SQLite3 also provides hashing itself.

share|improve this answer

i have a very simple code that alows two atemps at your password if they dont match it wont work

    users = {}
users["bob"] = "bob" 

username = raw_input("What is your username? ")
password = raw_input("What is your password? ")
if username in users.keys():
  expected_password = users[username]
  if expected_password == password:
    print "Welcome to Telemology,", username
  else:
    print "Didn't you forget your password,", username

password = raw_input("What is your password? ")
if username in users.keys():
  expected_password = users["bob"]
  if expected_password == password:
    print "Welcome to Telemology,", username
    #*here
  else:
    print "Didn't you forget your password,", username
else:
  print "Unknown user"
#continue your code for wrong here else*
share|improve this answer

You can always create a dictionary with the account names and their respective passwords. dictionary={'username':'password','some other username':'some other password'} if dictionary[choice] == choice2: print 'Welcome to Telemology, %s' %choice

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