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Why in Windows, can't you name a folder 'con'?

Whenever I try to name a folder as "con" (without the quotes) it defaults to its original name.

Why does it do this?

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closed as off topic by Will May 31 '11 at 15:19

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Emin, I am sorry. But why you should ask a question for which the info is already available on the net? –  shahkalpesh Jan 15 '09 at 21:03
    
Programming angle? –  Kev Jan 15 '09 at 21:07
    
I agree; it was easy to find answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071022041555AAkZGwZ (I hate Yahoo! Answers too, but it actually provided a valid answer) in a Google search for "windows rename folder to con." –  strager Jan 15 '09 at 21:09
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If that were the test for whether a question should be asked we would be closing 99% of them. The point is to build up tis site as an all-in-one resource. –  Ed S. Feb 27 '09 at 9:12
    
Not programming related in any way... should be closed –  Erik Funkenbusch Feb 27 '09 at 9:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Back in the dos days, "con" had a special meaning. It referred to the console, and allowed you to treat it like any other file. For example, you you might create a new text file by typing copy con new.txt. Then you could enter your text and hit ^Z when finished.

The thing is, you can still do that. Therefore, as far as the file system is concerned there is already an object out there named con. There are other reserved names as well, but I see that while typing this those names have been provided already in other answers.

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Ah; I had not known that. Pretty cool. =] –  strager Jan 15 '09 at 21:10
    
+ 1 for answering the implied question as to "why" CON is reserved. –  Charles Bretana Jan 15 '09 at 21:10
    
Whatever the reason might be, microsoft should have hidden this from the user. can you imagine an old couple (who doesn't have a clue about DOS and the old times of computing) getting frustrated trying to rename their grandchildren's photo album to CON (or the other reserved ones) ?? –  Emin Jan 15 '09 at 21:24
    
@Emin, Well, you can't name a folder "friends/family" either, but at least that gives you an error message. I think renaming to "con" (and others) shouldn't be silently ignored. –  strager Jan 15 '09 at 21:26
    
@strager you ment absolutely what I thought. I just cannot imagine my father trying to do that without an error message. He would probably come to me the next day saying the computer is broken :) –  Emin Jan 15 '09 at 21:31

Do not use the following reserved device names for the name of a file:

CON, PRN, AUX, NUL, COM1, COM2, COM3, COM4, COM5, COM6, COM7, COM8, COM9, LPT1, LPT2, LPT3, LPT4, LPT5, LPT6, LPT7, LPT8, and LPT9

Source: MSDN

Other names, such as drive names, cannot be used as well:

CLOCK$, A:-Z:

Source: Microsoft support

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Actually you can rename the folder to "con"

use this in the command prompt and this creates a system folder named "con" on your "C Drive"

md \\.\\C:\con

to remove this folder you need to use this in the command prompt

rd/s \\.\\C:\con

And just for those that are wondering "so why would you?" - my name is CON and if I wish to use that as my folder I WILL so "bugger you MS"

Con "OzDing"

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This dates back to MS-DOS. Reading or writing to a file named "CON:" read/wrote from the console. I imagine Windows is still supporting this for backwards compatibility.

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http://support.microsoft.com/kb/74496/en-us

Other reserved names: PRN AUX NUL LPT1 COM1

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From Microsoft TechNet:

Several special file names are reserved by the system and cannot be used for files or folders:

CON, AUX, COM1, COM2, COM3, COM4, LPT1, LPT2, LPT3, PRN, NUL

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Your link brings me to a "Windows XP" page without your quote. –  strager Jan 15 '09 at 21:05

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