Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have one dome name. www.abc.com

and i want to speedup all images an d static content from cookies domain.

what i require to do with that?

i want to create new sub domain with name static.abc.com but that time also cookie coming with both domain.

i am user dotnet panel for hosting.

technology is .net

share|improve this question
1  
You don't want a "cookies domain", you want a cookieless domain. –  thejh Dec 19 '10 at 19:20
    
but i required write cookie on www.abc.com it will automatically take cookie for sub domain. –  AjmeraInfo Dec 19 '10 at 19:21
    
How does this have 2 votes for off-topic? Seems on-topic to me. –  RPM1984 Dec 19 '10 at 22:48
    
See here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4105149/… –  RPM1984 Dec 19 '10 at 22:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you create a cookie, set it's Domain property to ".abc.com", that way the cookie will be shared by both the www.abc.com and static.abc.com subdomains.

share|improve this answer
1  
i don't want to cookie shared with other or static domain. –  AjmeraInfo Dec 19 '10 at 19:36
    
@AjmeraInfo: Then I misunderstood the question. If you don't want to share the cookies then you simply avoid setting the Domain property. –  Guffa Dec 19 '10 at 23:29

There are two ways to accomplish this. You could set the cookie for FQDN (fully-qualified domain name) of www.abc.com, but this would restrict the cookies to just www.abc.com. This may be stricter than you want.

The more common solution it to register a completely separate domain for cookieless hosting. This is used by many websites already.

  • Google uses gstatic.com
  • Facebook uses twimg.com (I think)
  • Yahoo uses yimg.com (I think)
  • EBay uses ebaystatic.com
  • etc.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.