Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a container div that holds an arbitrary number of widgets. I would like to have the width of each widget auto adjust so that each widget takes up the same amount of horizontal space within the container div. Very similar to the way a traditional table with cells works.

If I were to express it mathematically, the formula would be...

 widget-width = container-width/number-of-containers)

My markup is below

<div class="pre-footer">
    <div class="single widget_text">
        <h4>Widget Heading</h4>         
        <div class="textwidget">Widget text goes here.</div> 
    </div>      
    <div class="single widget_text">
        <h4>Widget Heading</h4>         
        <div class="textwidget">Widget text goes here.</div> 
    </div>      
    <div class="single widget_text">
        <h4>Widget Heading</h4>         
        <div class="textwidget">Widget text goes here.</div> 
    </div>      
</div>

In this example, the "pre-footer" div is the main container and its width is defined in the css as 900 pixels. Since there are 3 child divs (singe widget-text), I'd like each of these to occupy about 300 pixels of width.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The widget width should be a percentage, but like you say in response to stealthyninja's answer, you don't know beforehand which %. CSS cannot calculate the width for you so you have to do that with something else. The most obvious approach seems that you let a piece of javascript (JQuery) adjust the css value as soon as the number of widgets changes. something like this:

var numberOfWidgets = X;
var widgetWidth = Math.floor(100 / numberOfWidgets);
$("div.single").css({"width": widgetWidth + "%"});

Alternatively you can do this in asp.net or php on a postback and give the widgets an inline style:

width:xxxx%; 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Bazzz. This is probably the best available solution. And I understand CSS can't do a numeric calculation (at least one that's not controlled by the browser's internals). I was hoping that there was a css property or combo that I was missing that could assign a container's child elements to equal widths based on the available width of the parent container. –  Scott B Dec 20 '10 at 16:56
    
Unfortunately not, you can set an element's width relative to it's parent's width, but not relative to its siblings' width, or the number of siblings that it has. Perhaps in CSS3 this will be implemented, fingers crossed. :) –  Bazzz Dec 22 '10 at 10:17
    
best answer until css3 I suppose. Thanks Bazzz :) –  Scott B Dec 22 '10 at 18:29

@Scott B: You could do something like this --

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
<title></title>

<style type="text/css">
.pre-footer {
    background-color: grey;
    overflow: hidden;
    width: 900px;
}
.single {
    float: left;
    width: 33%;
}
</style>
</head>

<body>

<div class="pre-footer">
    <div class="single widget_text" style="background-color: red">
        <h4>Widget Heading 1</h4>
        <div class="textwidget">Widget text goes here.</div> 
    </div>      
    <div class="single widget_text" style="background-color: yellow">
        <h4>Widget Heading 2</h4>
        <div class="textwidget">Widget text goes here.</div> 
    </div>      
    <div class="single widget_text" style="background-color: blue">
        <h4>Widget Heading 3</h4>    
        <div class="textwidget">Widget text goes here.</div> 
    </div>
</div>

</body>
</html>

jsFiddle link: http://jsfiddle.net/Maats/

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the input, and your suggestion of 33% width works if there are 3 divs. However, the number of child divs is completely up to the end user. My example has 3, but they could have 1,2,3,4, etc... –  Scott B Dec 20 '10 at 1:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.