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Is there a nice way to call A::foo() from B::bar() in the following sample?

class A {
protected:
  void foo() {}
};

class B : public A {
public:
  void bar(A& a) { // edit: called with &a != this
    a.foo(); // does not work
  }
};

I can't think of anything other than declaring B to be a friend of A, but that could get pretty ugly with some more classes.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Why does B::bar need to call A::foo? If A::foo is protected, that is supposed to mean that only objects of type A and any type derived from A should be able to call it. If you really need to call A::foo from an unrelated class, perhaps it shouldn't be protected. –  James McNellis Dec 19 '10 at 20:57
    
And what is the question? –  Mihran Hovsepyan Dec 19 '10 at 20:57
    
What is the reason for passing an A instance to B when B is a type of A? –  birryree Dec 19 '10 at 20:58
    
@Mihran The 1st sentence is the question. –  BЈовић Dec 19 '10 at 20:58
    
I did not intend to use B::bar on *this but on other instances (actually on other subclasses of A). A::foo() is protected for a reason, I'm writing a library here and do not want developers to use it. –  lucas clemente Dec 19 '10 at 21:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, you can use a base-class function.

class A {
protected:
  void foo() {}
  void do_other_foo(A& ref) {
      ref.foo();
  }
};

class B : public A {
public:
  void bar(A& a) { // edit: called with &a != this
    this->do_other_foo(a);
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
that's working of course. not really nice, but probably the best solution. thanks! –  lucas clemente Dec 20 '10 at 0:12

Why are you passing object of type A? You could do like this :

class B : public A {
public:
  void bar() {
    foo();
  }
};

or, like this

class B : public A {
public:
  void bar() {
    A::foo();
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
I did not intend to use B::bar on *this but on other instances (actually on other subclasses of A). –  lucas clemente Dec 19 '10 at 21:00
    
@lucas Sounds like a design problem. Why is foo() protected? –  BЈовић Dec 19 '10 at 21:03
    
See my post above, I do not want classes / functions outside my library to use it. –  lucas clemente Dec 19 '10 at 21:06

Here's an approach to giving "protected" like access, allowing calls by any derived classes or object. It uses a protected token type, required to un-lock privileged methods:

struct A
{
protected:
    //Zero sized struct which allows only derived classes to call privileged methods
    struct DerivedOnlyAccessToken{};

public:     //public in the normal sense :
    void foo() {}

public:     //For derived types only :
    void privilegedStuff( DerivedOnlyAccessToken aKey );
};

struct B: A
{
    void doPrivelegedStuff( A& a )
    {
        //Can create a token here
        a.privilegedStuff( DerivedOnlyAccessToken() );
    }
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

    A a;
    a.foo();
    a.privilegedStuff( A::DerivedOnlyAccessToken() ); // compile error.

    B b;
    b.doPrivelegedStuff( a );

    return 0;
}

This is not my idea. I read it some place. Sorry I dont recall who's cunning idea it was.

I expect the compiler can elide the aKey parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice idea, thanks a lot! –  lucas clemente Jun 24 '12 at 20:45

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