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How do I convert a long to a byte[] and back in Java? I'm trying convert a long to a byte[] so that I will be able to send the byte[] over a tcp connection. On the other side I want to take that byte[] and convert it back into a double. Any tips would be appreciated.

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Another alternative will be Maps.transformValues, a general tooling for converting collections. docs.guava-libraries.googlecode.com/git-history/release/javadoc/… –  Raul Dec 18 '12 at 16:29

8 Answers 8

up vote 36 down vote accepted
public byte[] longToBytes(long x) {
    ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(Long.BYTES);
    buffer.putLong(x);
    return buffer.array();
}

public long bytesToLong(byte[] bytes) {
    ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(Long.BYTES);
    buffer.put(bytes);
    buffer.flip();//need flip 
    return buffer.getLong();
}

Or wrapped in a class to avoid repeatedly creating ByteBuffers:

public class ByteUtils {
    private static ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(Long.BYTES);    

    public static byte[] longToBytes(long x) {
        buffer.putLong(0, x);
        return buffer.array();
    }

    public static long bytesToLong(byte[] bytes) {
        buffer.put(bytes, 0, bytes.length);
        buffer.flip();//need flip 
        return buffer.getLong();
    }
}
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2  
That utility method isn't thread-safe, so I'm not sure that's much better... –  bkail Dec 20 '10 at 3:54
9  
For goodness sake people, some things are left as an exercise for the reader. This should give them a good start. –  Brad Mace Dec 20 '10 at 3:55
2  
I think the bytesToLong() here would fail as the position after the put is at the end of the buffer, not the beginning. I think you'd get a buffer underflow exception. –  Alex Miller Sep 1 '11 at 13:56
1  
Thanks for flip() –  ruruskyi Sep 19 '13 at 9:48
1  
Great answer. It wasn't immediately clear to me why you need to "flip", but I stumbled upon this article which helped a lot! tutorials.jenkov.com/java-nio/buffers.html Perhaps flip is a misnomer? –  studro Nov 1 '13 at 12:54

Why do you need the byte[]? why not just write it to the socket?

I assume you mean long rather than Long, the later needs to allow for null values.

DataOutputStream dos = new DataOutputStream(
     new BufferedOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream()));
dos.writeLong(longValue);

DataInputStream dis = new DataInputStream(
     new BufferedInputStream(socket.getInputStream()));
long longValue = dis.readLong();
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1  
He asked how you convert to byte[] and back. Good answer but didn't answer the question. You ask why because you assume it is unnecessary but that's a wrong assumption. What if he is doing cross-language or cross-platform? DataOutputStream won't help you there. –  user1132959 May 12 '13 at 19:05
    
If he's doing cross-language or cross-platform, then sending the bytes in a known order is important. This method does that (it writes them "high byte first") according to the docs. The accepted answer does not (it writes them in the "current order" according to the docs). The question states that he wants to send them over a TCP connection. The byte[] is just a means to that end. –  Ian McLaird Aug 16 '13 at 19:27

You could use the Byte conversion methods from Google Guava.

Example:

byte[] bytes = Longs.toByteArray(12345L);
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You can simply use String as intermediate. Note, this WILL give you the correct result even though it seems like using String might yield the wrong results.

from Long to byte[]:

byte[] arr = String.valueOf(longVar).getBytes();

from byte[] to Long:

long longVar = Long.valueOf(new String(byteArr)).longValue();
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No it won't, because your approach is incorrect: Long.valueOf(new String(new byte[]{-1})) gives java.lang.NumberFormatException: For input string: "�" –  fnt Nov 19 at 8:45

If you are already using an OutputStream to write to the socket, then DataOutputStream might be a good fit. Here is an example:

// Assumes you are currently working with a SocketOutputStream.

SocketOutputStream outputStream = ...
long longValue = ...

DataOutputStream dataOutputStream = new DataOutputStream(outputStream);

dataOutputStream.writeLong(longValue);
dataOutputStream.flush();

There are similar methods for short, int, float, etc. You can then use DataInputStream on the receiving side.

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You could use the implementation in org.apache.hadoop.hbase.util.Bytes http://hbase.apache.org/apidocs/org/apache/hadoop/hbase/util/Bytes.html

The source code is here:

http://grepcode.com/file/repository.cloudera.com/content/repositories/releases/com.cloudera.hbase/hbase/0.89.20100924-28/org/apache/hadoop/hbase/util/Bytes.java#Bytes.toBytes%28long%29

Look for the toLong and toBytes methods.

I believe the software license allows you to take parts of the code and use it but please verify that.

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This is the correct and most performant answer. –  Aaron Zinman Nov 5 at 0:15

Just write the long to a DataOutputStream with an underlying ByteArrayOutputStream. From the ByteArrayOutputStream you can get the byte-array via toByteArray():

class Main
{

        public static byte[] long2byte(long l) throws IOException
        {
        ByteArrayOutputStream baos=new ByteArrayOutputStream(Long.SIZE/8);
        DataOutputStream dos=new DataOutputStream(baos);
        dos.writeLong(l);
        byte[] result=baos.toByteArray();
        dos.close();    
        return result;
        }


        public static long byte2long(byte[] b) throws IOException
        {
        ByteArrayInputStream baos=new ByteArrayInputStream(b);
        DataInputStream dos=new DataInputStream(baos);
        long result=dos.readLong();
        dos.close();
        return result;
        }


        public static void main (String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception
        {

         long l=123456L;
         byte[] b=long2byte(l);
         System.out.println(l+": "+byte2long(b));       
        }
}

Works for other primitives accordingly.

Hint: For TCP you do not need the byte[] manually. You will use a Socket socket and its streams

OutputStream os=socket.getOutputStream(); 
DataOutputStream dos=new DataOutputStream(os);
dos.writeLong(l);
//etc ..

instead.

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 public static long bytesToLong(byte[] bytes) {
        if (bytes.length > 8) {
            throw new IllegalMethodParameterException("byte should not be more than 8 bytes");

        }
        long r = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.length; i++) {
            r = r << 8;
            r += bytes[i];
        }

        return r;
    }



public static byte[] longToBytes(long l) {
        ArrayList<Byte> bytes = new ArrayList<Byte>();
        while (l != 0) {
            bytes.add((byte) (l % (0xff + 1)));
            l = l >> 8;
        }
        byte[] bytesp = new byte[bytes.size()];
        for (int i = bytes.size() - 1, j = 0; i >= 0; i--, j++) {
            bytesp[j] = bytes.get(i);
        }
        return bytesp;
    }
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1  
you can skip the ArrayList: public static byte[] longToBytes(long l) { long num = l; byte[] bytes = new byte[8]; for (int i = bytes.length - 1, i >= 0; i--) { bytes[i] = (byte)(num & 0xff); num >>= 8; } return bytesp; } –  eckes Nov 16 '13 at 16:05

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