Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to know how to bump the last digit in a version number using bash.

e.g.

VERSION=1.9.0.9
NEXT_VERSION=1.9.0.10

EDIT: The version number will only contain natural numbers.

Can the solution be generic to handle any number of parts in a version number.

e.g.

1.2
1.2.3
1.2.3.4
1.2.3.4.5
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let's start with Michael's basic answer:

VERSIONS="
1.2.3.4.4
1.2.3.4.5.6.7.7
1.9.9
1.9.0.9
"

for VERSION in $VERSIONS; do 
    echo $VERSION | awk -F. '{$NF = $NF + 1;} 1' | sed 's/ /./g'
done

How can we improve on this? Here are a bunch of ideas extracted from the copious set of comments.

The trailing '1' in the program is crucial to its operation, but it is not the most explicit way of doing things. The odd '1' at the end is a boolean value that is true, and therefore matches every line and triggers the default action (since there is no action inside braces after it) which is to print $0, the line read, as amended by the previous command.

Hence, why not this awk command, which obviates the sed command?

awk -F. '{$NF+=1; OFS="."; print $0}'

Of course, we could refine things further - in several stages. You could use the bash '<<<' string redirection operator to avoid the pipe:

awk -F. '...' <<< $VERSION

The next observation would be that given a series of lines, a single execution of awk could handle them all:

echo "$VERSIONS" | awk -F. '/[0-9]+\./{$NF+=1;OFS=".";print}'

without the for loop. The double quotes around "$VERSION" preserve the newlines in the string. The pipe is still unnecessary, leading to:

awk -F. '/[0-9]+\./{$NF+=1;OFS=".";print}' <<< "$VERSIONS"

The regex ignores the blank lines in $VERSION by only processing lines that contain a digit followed by a dot. Of course, setting OFS in each line is a tad clumsy, and '+=1' can be abbreviated '++', so you could use:

awk -F. '/[0-9]+\./{$NF++;print}' OFS=. <<< "$VERSIONS"

(or you could include 'BEGIN{OFS="."}' in the program, but that is rather verbose.

The '<<<' notation is only supported by Bash and not by Korn, Bourne or other POSIX shells (except as a non-standard extension parallelling the Bash notation). The AWK program is going to be supported by any version of awk you are likely to be able to lay hands on (but the variable assignment on the command line was not supported by old UNIX 7th Edition AWK).

share|improve this answer

I have come up with this.

VERSIONS="
1.2.3.4.4
1.2.3.4.5.6.7.7
1.9.9
1.9.0.9
"

for VERSION in $VERSIONS; do 
    echo $VERSION | awk -F. '{$NF = $NF + 1;} 1' | sed 's/ /./g'
done
share|improve this answer
1  
Am I missing the obvious? ... Oh, yes: I see. I'm not sure that's the most explicit way of doing things. The odd '1' at the end matches the first line and prints $0, the line read, as amended by the previous command. Why not: awk -F. '1{$NF+=1; OFS="."; print $0}' which obviates the sed command. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 19 '10 at 23:00
    
Thank you for the more elegant solution –  Michael Dec 19 '10 at 23:04
    
Of course, we could refine things further - in a couple of stages. One would use the bash '<<<' string redirection operator to avoid the pipe: awk -F. '...' <<< $VERSION. The next observation would be that given a series of lines, a single execution of awk could handle them all: echo "$VERSIONS" | awk -F. '/[0-9]+\./{$NF+=1;OFS=".";print}' without the for loop; the double quotes around "$VERSION" preserve the newlines in the string, and then the pipe is still unnecessary, leading to: awk -F. '/[0-9]+\./{$NF+=1;OFS=".";print}' <<< "$VERSIONS". The regex ignores the blank lines. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 19 '10 at 23:55
    
Of course, setting OFS in each line is a tad clumsy, and '+=1' can be abbreviated '++', so you could use: awk -F. '/[0-9]+\./{$NF++;print}' OFS=. <<< "$VERSIONS" (or you could include 'BEGIN{OFS="."}' in the program, but that is rather verbose. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 19 '10 at 23:58
1  
@Jonathan: The trailing 1 is a boolean that forces the default action which is print. It's different from a leading 1 which selects only the first line of input. For incrementing, $NF++ also works. You only need to set the output delimiter once. Result: awk -F. '{$NF++}1' OFS=. or awk -F. '1{$NF++}1' OFS=.. I prefer an explicit print instead of the implicit one, though, but the $0 isn't necessary: awk -F. '{$NF++; print}' OFS=.. The OFS could also be set using a -v argument or in a BEGIN clause. I see you said several of the things I was in the process of typing up. –  Dennis Williamson Dec 20 '10 at 0:05
if [[ "$VERSION" == *.* ]]; then
    majorpart="${VERSION%.*}."
else
    majorpart=""
fi
minorpart="${VERSION##*.}"
NEXT_VERSION="$majorpart$((minorpart+1))"

Warning: if the minor part of the version number isn't in the expected format (integer, no leading zeros), this may have trouble. Some examples: "1.033" -> "1.28" (since 033 is octal for 27), "1.2.b" -> "1.2.1" (unless b is a defined variable, it'll be treated as 0), "1.2.3a" -> error ("3a" isn't a number). Depending on how many cases you want to cover, this can be made arbitrarily complex.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can force a number such as "033" to be interpreted as decimal like so: NEXT_VERSION="$majorpart$((10#$minorpart+1))" and "033" will become "34". It's a good idea to do this since "038" will produce and error. However, it will cause your "b" example to produce an error. –  Dennis Williamson Dec 19 '10 at 23:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.