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Besides the obvious differences:

  • Use enumerateObjectsUsingBlock when you need both the index and the object
  • Don't use enumerateObjectsUsingBlock when you need to modify local variables (I was wrong about this, see bbum's answer)

Is enumerateObjectsUsingBlock generally considered better or worse when for (id obj in myArray) would also work? What are the advantages/disadvantages (for example is it more or less performant)?

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1  
I like to use it if I need the current index. –  Besi Sep 3 '12 at 15:28
    
See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/8509662/… –  Simon Whitaker Jun 30 '13 at 3:31
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4 Answers

up vote 246 down vote accepted

Ultimately, use whichever pattern you want to use and comes more naturally in the context.

While for(... in ...) is quite convenient and syntactically brief, enumerateObjectsUsingBlock: has a number of features that may or may not prove interesting:

  • enumerateObjectsUsingBlock: will be as fast or faster than fast enumeration (for(... in ...) uses the NSFastEnumeration support to implement enumeration). Fast enumeration requires translation from an internal representation to the representation for fast enumeration. There is overhead therein. Block-based enumeration allows the collection class to enumerate contents as quickly as the fastest traversal of the native storage format. Likely irrelevant for arrays, but it can be a huge difference for dictionaries.

  • "Don't use enumerateObjectsUsingBlock when you need to modify local variables" - not true; you can declare your locals as __block and they'll be writable in the block.

  • enumerateObjectsWithOptions:usingBlock: supports either concurrent or reverse enumeration.

  • with dictionaries, block based enumeration is the only way to retrieve the key and value simultaneously.

Personally, I use enumerateObjectsUsingBlock: more often than for (... in ...), but - again - personal choice.

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9  
Wow, very informative. I wish I could accept both of these answers, but I'm going with Chuck's because it resonates a bit more with me. Also, I found your blog (friday.com/bbum/2009/08/29/blocks-tips-tricks) while searching for __block and learned even more. Thank you. –  Paul Wheeler Dec 20 '10 at 5:19
    
Just for sheer informative value I'm giving this a vote. Nice answer. –  imnk Jun 16 '11 at 15:06
4  
For the record, block-based enumeration is not always "as fast or faster" mikeabdullah.net/slow-block-based-dictionary-enumeration.html –  Mike Abdullah Nov 6 '12 at 17:27
1  
Someone posted it to the Objective-C mailing list at some point, prompting this reply: lists.apple.com/archives/objc-language/2012/Sep/msg00012.html –  Mike Abdullah Nov 8 '12 at 9:13
2  
@VanDuTran Blocks are only executed on a separate thread if you tell them to be executed on a separate thread. Unless you use the concurrency option of enumeration, then it'll be executed on the same thread as the call was made –  bbum Jun 17 '13 at 15:52
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For simple enumeration, simply using fast enumeration (i.e. a for…in… loop) is the more idiomatic option. The block method might be marginally faster, but that doesn't matter much in most cases — few programs are CPU-bound, and even then it's rare that the loop itself rather than the computation inside will be a bottleneck.

A simple loop also reads more clearly. Here's the boilerplate of the two versions:

for (id x in y){
}

[y enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id x, NSUInteger index, BOOL *stop){
}];

Even if you add a variable to track the index, the simple loop is easier to read.

So when you should use enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:? When you're storing a block to execute later or in multiple places. It's good for when you're actually using a block as a first-class function rather than an overwrought replacement for a loop body.

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4  
enumerateObjectsUsingBlock: will either be the same speed or faster than fast enumeration in all cases. for(... in ...) uses fast enumeration which requires the collection to provide some interim representation of the internal data structures. As you note, likely irrelevant. –  bbum Dec 20 '10 at 5:04
2  
+1 When you're storing a block to execute later or in multiple places. It's good for when you're actually using a block as a first-class function rather than an overwrought replacement for a loop body. –  Steve Jul 4 '11 at 16:05
4  
@bbum My own tests show that enumerateObjects... can actually be slower then fast enumeration with a loop. I ran this test several thousand times; the body of the block and loop were the same single line of code: [(NSOperation *)obj cancel];. The averages: fast enum loop - -[JHStatusBar dequeueStatusMessage:] [Line: 147] Fast enumeration time (for..in..loop): 0.000009 and for the block - -[JHStatusBar dequeueStatusMessage:] [Line: 147] Enumeration time using block: 0.000043. Weird that the time difference is so large and consistent but, obviously, this is a very specific test case. –  chown Oct 30 '12 at 17:37
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To answer the question about performance, I made some tests using my performance test project. I wanted to know which of the three options for sending a message to all objects in an array is the fastest.

The options were:

1) makeObjectsPerformSelector

[arr makeObjectsPerformSelector:@selector(_stubMethod)];

2) fast enumeration & regular message send

for (id item in arr)
{
    [item _stubMethod];
}

3) enumerateObjectsUsingBlock & regular message send

[arr enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) 
 {
     [obj _stubMethod];
 }];

It turns out that makeObjectsPerformSelector was the slowest by far. It took twice as long as fast enumeration. And enumerateObjectsUsingBlock was the fastest, it was around 15-20% faster than fast iteration.

So if you're very concerned about the best possible performance, use enumerateObjectsUsingBlock. But keep in mind that in some cases the time it takes to enumerate a collection is dwarfed by the time it takes to run whatever code you want each object to execute.

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Although this question is old and things might have changed, the accepted answer is incorrect.

The newer enumerateObjectsUsingBlock was not meant to supersede for-in. The method actually adds new, different functionality:

  • Using blocks to enumerate an array allows an implementation to use arbitrary logic (blocks generated in a different place than it is applied)
  • Concurrent enumeration for larger collections or heavy computation (using the withOptions:)

For-in on the other hand is still the idiomatic method of enumerating a collection. It benefits from brevity of code, readability and probably additional compiler optimizations.

A quick test concludes that in the year 2014 on iOS 7, enumerateObjectsUsingBlock is consistently 700% slower than for-in (based on 1mm iterations of a 100 item array).

Is performance a real practical concern here?

Definitely not, with rare exception.

The point is to demonstrate that there is little or no benefit to using enumerateObjectsUsingBlock over for-in without a good reason. It doesn't make the code more readable... or faster... or thread-safer (another common misconception).

The choice comes down to personal preference. As a 7-year iOS engineer who has led iOS teams building a some of the more famous iOS apps with tens of millions of users, my personal advice is to use the simplest and most idiomatic option: in this case, Fast Enumeration using for-in.

The quick benchmark code:

NSMutableArray *arr = [NSMutableArray array];
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    arr[i] = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", i];
}
__block int i;
__block int length;

uint64_t a1 = mach_absolute_time();
i = 1000 * 1000;
while (--i > 0) {
    for (NSString *s in arr) {
        length = s.length;
    }
}
NSLog(@"For-in %llu", mach_absolute_time()-a1);

uint64_t b1 = mach_absolute_time();
i = 1000 * 1000;
while (--i > 0) {
    [arr enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(NSString *s, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
        length = s.length;
    }];
}
NSLog(@"Enum %llu", mach_absolute_time()-b1);

Results:

2014-06-11 14:37:47.717 Test[57483:60b] For-in 1087754062
2014-06-11 14:37:55.492 Test[57483:60b] Enum   7775447746
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