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I am setting the .Text value of a textbox, disabling it, and then calling a BackgroundWorker to do a lengthy filesystem operation. The textbox does not update with the new text value until about halfway through the BackgroundWorker operation.

What can I do to force the texbox to show the new text value ASAP? Relevant code below:

void BeginCacheCandidates()
{
    textBox1.Text = "Indexing..."; // <-- this does not update until about 20 to 30 seconds later
    textBox1.Enabled = false;
    backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();
}

void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, System.ComponentModel.DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    //prime the cache
    CacheCandidates(candidatesCacheFileName);
}

void backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, System.ComponentModel.RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    textBox1.Text = "";
    textBox1.Enabled = true;
    textBox1.Focus();
}

Update: I resolved the issue. It was code unrelated to this - I had overridden WndProc and it was going into a loop...

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What exactly is happening inside CacheCandidates? –  Wayne Dec 20 '10 at 5:15
1  
What's happening BEFORE BeginCacheCandidates? If you remove the long running operation in CacheCandidates altogether, does the UI update right away? It sounds like maybe there is a problem happening earlier... –  Jeff Dec 20 '10 at 5:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unless there's some detail I'm missing, wouldn't ReportProgress give you what you want?

void BeginCacheCandidates()
{
    textBox1.Text = "Indexing...";
    textBox1.Enabled = false;
    backgroundWorker1.ReportProgress += new ProgressChangedEventHandler(handleProgress)
    backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();
}

void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, System.ComponentModel.DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    //prime the cache
    backgroundWorker1.ReportProgress(<some int>, <text to update>);
    CacheCandidates(candidatesCacheFileName);
}

void handleProgress(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
{ 
    ... 
    textBox1.Text = e.UserState as String; 
    ... 
}
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No, I don't need to report any progress while it's underway, I just need to change textbox text at start and end of process. It's the textBox1.Text = "Indexing..." that is not being displayed until 20 to 30 seconds later. –  RedFilter Dec 20 '10 at 5:04
    
Yes, that seemed too easy. Writing a quick program worked as expected (quick update of textbox). Changing the text should invalidate things. What happens if you try invalidating the parent? Just sounds like it's not getting invalidated or the UI update is getting blocked. –  doobop Dec 20 '10 at 5:27
    
Not sure what you mean by invalidate...can you expand on that? –  RedFilter Dec 20 '10 at 13:27
    
Control.Invalidate() causes the paint method to refresh the control (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/598t492a.aspx). Changing the text in the Textbox causes an invalidation without the need to directly call textBox1.Invalidate(). Also ties into the Update() call mentioned by decyclone. –  doobop Dec 20 '10 at 14:21
    
I accepted this answer because I learned about Invalidate. –  RedFilter Dec 20 '10 at 15:16

Try invoking the change on the textbox instead of directly calling it.

textBox1.BeginInvoke(new MethodInvoker(() => { textBox1.Text = string.Empty; }));

This will cause the change to happen on the Form's thread.

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Use Form.Update() method to force UI updates.

void BeginCacheCandidates()
{
    textBox1.Text = "Indexing..."; // <-- this does not update until about 20 to 30 seconds later
    textBox1.Enabled = false;
    this.Update(); // Force update UI
    backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();
}
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