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How can I write a simple batch file to measure the performance of a console-based application? The console application accepts two command line arguments.

I would like to get:

StartTime = System Dos time
myconsoleapp arg1, arg2
StopTime = System Dos Time
timeDelta = stoptime - starttime

I would write the timeDelta to a file or display on the console.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A pure batch solution could be.

@echo off
set "startTime=%time%"
for /L %%n in (1,1, 1000) do <nul set /p "="
set "stopTime=%time%"
call :timeDiff diff startTime stopTime
echo %diff% milli seconds
goto :eof

:timeDiff
setlocal
call :timeToMS time1 "%~2"
call :timeToMS time2 "%~3"
set /a diff=time2-time1
(
  ENDLOCAL
  set "%~1=%diff%"
  goto :eof
)

:timeToMS
::### WARNING, enclose the time in " ", because it can contain comma seperators
SETLOCAL EnableDelayedExpansion
FOR /F "tokens=1,2,3,4 delims=:,.^ " %%a IN ("!%~2!") DO (
  set /a "ms=(((30%%a%%100)*60+7%%b)*60+3%%c-42300)*1000+(1%%d0 %% 1000)"
)
(
  ENDLOCAL
  set %~1=%ms%
  goto :eof
)
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1  
note that the strange code setting variable ms is trying to avoid interpreting 08 as an octal number, while folding part of the calculation into that technique. A more readable format would be: SET /A "ms=((100\%\%a \%\% 100) * 3600 + (100\%\%b \%\% 100) * 60 + (100\%\%c \%\% 100))*1000 + (1\%\%d \%\% 1000)". Where 100%%a %% 100 gives the value of a as a decimal even if it starts with a zero, and avoids errors about 08 and 09 not being valid octal ("Invalid number. Numeric constants are either decimal (17), hexadecimal (0x11), or octal (021).") –  user1663987 Nov 4 at 1:09

Below batch "program" should do what you want. Please note that it outputs the data in centiseconds instead of milliseconds. The precision of the used commands is only centiseconds.

Here is an example output:

STARTTIME: 13:42:52,25
ENDTIME: 13:42:56,51
STARTTIME: 4937225 centiseconds
ENDTIME: 4937651 centiseconds
DURATION: 426 in centiseconds
00:00:04,26

Here is the batch script:

@echo off
setlocal

rem The format of %TIME% is HH:MM:SS,CS for example 23:59:59,99
set STARTTIME=%TIME%

rem here begins the command you want to measure
dir /s > nul
rem here ends the command you want to measure

set ENDTIME=%TIME%

rem output as time
echo STARTTIME: %STARTTIME%
echo ENDTIME: %ENDTIME%

rem convert STARTTIME and ENDTIME to centiseconds
set /A STARTTIME=(1%STARTTIME:~0,2%-100)*360000 + (1%STARTTIME:~3,2%-100)*6000 + (1%STARTTIME:~6,2%-100)*100 + (1%STARTTIME:~9,2%-100)
set /A ENDTIME=(1%ENDTIME:~0,2%-100)*360000 + (1%ENDTIME:~3,2%-100)*6000 + (1%ENDTIME:~6,2%-100)*100 + (1%ENDTIME:~9,2%-100)

rem calculating the duratyion is easy
set /A DURATION=%ENDTIME%-%STARTTIME%

rem we might have measured the time inbetween days
if %ENDTIME% LSS %STARTTIME% set set /A DURATION=%STARTTIME%-%ENDTIME%

rem now break the centiseconds down to hors, minutes, seconds and the remaining centiseconds
set /A DURATIONH=%DURATION% / 360000
set /A DURATIONM=(%DURATION% - %DURATIONH%*360000) / 6000
set /A DURATIONS=(%DURATION% - %DURATIONH%*360000 - %DURATIONM%*6000) / 100
set /A DURATIONHS=(%DURATION% - %DURATIONH%*360000 - %DURATIONM%*6000 - %DURATIONS%*100)

rem some formatting
if %DURATIONH% LSS 10 set DURATIONH=0%DURATIONH%
if %DURATIONM% LSS 10 set DURATIONM=0%DURATIONM%
if %DURATIONS% LSS 10 set DURATIONS=0%DURATIONS%
if %DURATIONHS% LSS 10 set DURATIONHS=0%DURATIONHS%

rem outputing
echo STARTTIME: %STARTTIME% centiseconds
echo ENDTIME: %ENDTIME% centiseconds
echo DURATION: %DURATION% in centiseconds
echo %DURATIONH%:%DURATIONM%:%DURATIONS%,%DURATIONHS%

endlocal
goto :EOF
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