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Is there any method for implement do while loop in SQL server 2008?

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4  
The answer given by Rahul is correct but what exactly are you trying to achieve? Loops are expensive compared to set based solutions. Perhaps it is possible to avoid a loop altogether. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Dec 20 '10 at 7:33
1  
why -1? down voter please explain... –  Nithesh Jan 21 at 13:38
    
Do not use loops if at all possible and I would estimate that 95% of the time or more it is possible to avoid them. Loops and cursors are performance killers and should never be written by anyone who is not an experienced DBA with at least five years of performance tuning. –  HLGEM Jul 18 at 17:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 54 down vote accepted

I am not sure about DO-WHILE IN MS SQL Server 2008 but you can change your WHILE loop logic, so as to USE like DO-WHILE loop.

Examples are taken from here: http://blog.sqlauthority.com/2007/10/24/sql-server-simple-example-of-while-loop-with-continue-and-break-keywords/

  1. Example of WHILE Loop

    DECLARE @intFlag INT
    SET @intFlag = 1
    WHILE (@intFlag <=5)
    BEGIN
        PRINT @intFlag
        SET @intFlag = @intFlag + 1
    END
    GO
    

    ResultSet:

    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    
  2. Example of WHILE Loop with BREAK keyword

    DECLARE @intFlag INT
    SET @intFlag = 1
    WHILE (@intFlag <=5)
    BEGIN
        PRINT @intFlag
        SET @intFlag = @intFlag + 1
        IF @intFlag = 4
            BREAK;
    END
    GO
    

    ResultSet:

    1
    2
    3
    
  3. Example of WHILE Loop with CONTINUE and BREAK keywords

    DECLARE @intFlag INT
    SET @intFlag = 1
    WHILE (@intFlag <=5)
    BEGIN
        PRINT @intFlag
        SET @intFlag = @intFlag + 1
        CONTINUE;
        IF @intFlag = 4 -- This will never executed
            BREAK;
    END
    GO
    

    ResultSet:

    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    

But try to avoid loops at database level. Reference.

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7  
+1 but you should definitly emphasize the avoid loops phrase. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Dec 20 '10 at 7:31
8  
The same examples are given here, are you the author of this website? blog.sqlauthority.com/2007/10/24/… –  Anar Khalilov Nov 6 '13 at 12:41
    
@AnarKhalilov: good finding! :D I edited Pratik's post, pasted this link into it, and put the whole block of examples in a blockquote. (In its previous form, Pratik's answer was simply plagiarism. ;) ) –  Sk8erPeter Jun 11 at 17:37
    
@Sk8erPeter Just doing what I should. –  Anar Khalilov Jun 11 at 20:34

If you are not very offended by the GOTO keyword, it can be used to simulate a DO / WHILE in T-SQL. Consider the following rather nonsensical example written in pseudocode:

SET I=1
DO
 PRINT I
 SET I=I+1
WHILE I<=10

Here is the equivalent T-SQL code using goto:

DECLARE @I INT=1;
START:                -- DO
  PRINT @I;
  SET @I+=1;
IF @I<=10 GOTO START; -- WHILE @I<=10

Notice the one to one mapping between the GOTO enabled solution and the original DO / WHILE pseudocode. A similar implementation using a WHILE loop would look like:

DECLARE @I INT=1;
WHILE (1=1)              -- DO
 BEGIN
  PRINT @I;
  SET @I+=1;
  IF NOT (@I<=10) BREAK; -- WHILE @I<=10
 END

Now, you could of course rewrite this particular example as a simple WHILE loop, since this is not such a good candidate for a DO / WHILE construct. The emphasis was on example brevity rather than applicability, since legitimate cases requiring a DO / WHILE are rare.


REPEAT / UNTIL, anyone?

SET I=1
REPEAT
  PRINT I
  SET I=I+1
UNTIL I>10

... and the GOTO based solution in T-SQL:

DECLARE @I INT=1;
START:                    -- REPEAT
  PRINT @I;
  SET @I+=1;
IF NOT(@I>10) GOTO START; -- UNTIL @I>10

Through creative use of GOTO and logic inversion via the NOT keyword, there is a very close relationship between the original pseudocode and the GOTO based solution. A similar solution using a WHILE loop looks like:

DECLARE @I INT=1;
WHILE (1=1)       -- REPEAT
 BEGIN
  PRINT @I;
  SET @I+=1;
  IF @I>10 BREAK; -- UNTIL @I>10
 END

An argument can be made that for the case of the REPEAT / UNTIL, the WHILE based solution is simpler, because the if condition is not inverted. On the other hand it is also more verbose.

If it wasn't for all of the disdain around the use of GOTO, these might even be idiomatic solutions for those few times when these particular (evil) looping constructs are necessary in T-SQL code for the sake of clarity.

Use these at your own discretion, trying not to suffer the wrath of your fellow developers when they catch you using the much maligned GOTO.

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3  
+1: definitely answers the question better than the accepted answer. –  Baboon Sep 28 '12 at 8:45

I seem to recall reading this article more than once, and the answer is only close to what I need.

Usually when I think I'm going to need a DO WHILE in T-SQL it's because I'm iterating a cursor, and I'm looking largely for optimal clarity (vs. optimal speed). In T-SQL that seems to fit a WHILE TRUE / IF BREAK.

If that's the scenario that brought you here, this snippet may save you a moment. Otherwise, welcome back, me. Now I can be certain I've been here more than once. :)

DECLARE Id INT, @Title VARCHAR(50)
DECLARE Iterator CURSOR FORWARD_ONLY FOR
SELECT Id, Title FROM dbo.SourceTable
OPEN Iterator
WHILE 1=1 BEGIN
    FETCH NEXT FROM @InputTable INTO @Id, @Title
    IF @@FETCH_STATUS < 0 BREAK
    PRINT 'Do something with ' + @Title
END
CLOSE Iterator
DEALLOCATE Iterator

Unfortunately, T-SQL doesn't seem to offer a cleaner way to singly-define the loop operation, than this infinite loop.

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