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What I am doing is simple:realloc the message buffer to one size(size_t)larger:size+1,but my original content is modified(how does '33' come out?):

message:0x9ead008
  0:0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
message:0x9ead008
  0:0 0 0 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 

my code is so simple that I found no where bugs could hide:

#include <stdlib.h>   
#include <string.h>

void print_message(int* message,long n)   
{   
    int i;    
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)   
    {   
        if(i%48==0)    
            printf("\n%3d:",i/48);   
        printf("%d ",message[i]);                
    }    
    printf("\n");        

}

void realloc_test()
{
    int n=10;

    int* message=(int*)malloc(n*sizeof(int));
    printf("message:%p\n",message);

    print_message(message,n);
    memset(message,0,n);
    message=(int*)realloc(message,n+1);
    printf("message:%p\n",message);
    print_message(message,n+1);

    free(message);    
}

int main(int argc,char* argv[])   
{   
    realloc_test();     
    return 0;   
}
share|improve this question
    
Your code compiles and runs without incident on my system. Perhaps provide more detail about your code, such as how you are compiling it, or on what system. –  Alex Reynolds Dec 20 '10 at 8:06
    
ubuntu10.04 x86,make sf what's the output on your system? –  schemacs Dec 20 '10 at 8:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is an error in your program. In function realloc_test() change the line

message=(int*)realloc(message,n+1);

to

message=(int*)realloc(message,(n+1)*sizeof(int));

I think this will solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
I found the same solution,but not really understand what the difference is between size_t and int(or has any matter with difference between size_t and int). –  schemacs Dec 20 '10 at 8:24
3  
second argument to realloc is the new size of allocated memory IN BYTES. So if you want memory for n+1 integers then the byte size of required memory will be (n+1)*NUMBER OF BYTES PER INTEGER. To get the number of bytes for one integer you use sizeof(int). This is similar to first argument of malloc where you specify number of bytes that you need. –  binW Dec 20 '10 at 8:35

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