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Why there can be only one TIMESTAMP column with CURRENT_TIMESTAMP in DEFAULT or ON UPDATE clause?

CREATE TABLE `foo` (
  `ProductID` INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
  `AddedDate` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  `UpdatedDate` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
) ENGINE=INNODB;

The error that results:

Error Code : 1293

Incorrect table definition; there can be only one TIMESTAMP column with CURRENT_TIMESTAMP in DEFAULT or ON UPDATE clause

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1  
It's actually much worse than what the error message make it look to be. You cannot define a column with CURRENT_TIMESTAMP in DEFAULT or ON UPDATE clause once there's a column with TIMESTAMP data type, no matter if it got an extra clause! –  Nicolas Buduroi Jan 14 '11 at 4:11
4  
So this work: CREATE TABLE foo (created_on TIMESTAMP DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, updated_on TIMESTAMP), but not this: CREATE TABLE foo (updated_on TIMESTAMP, created_on TIMESTAMP DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP) –  Nicolas Buduroi Jan 14 '11 at 4:14
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7 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

This limitation, which was only due to historical, code legacy reasons, has been lifted in recent versions of MySQL:

Changes in MySQL 5.6.5 (2012-04-10, Milestone 8)

Previously, at most one TIMESTAMP column per table could be automatically initialized or updated to the current date and time. This restriction has been lifted. Any TIMESTAMP column definition can have any combination of DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP and ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP clauses. In addition, these clauses now can be used with DATETIME column definitions. For more information, see Automatic Initialization and Updating for TIMESTAMP and DATETIME.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/relnotes/mysql/5.6/en/news-5-6-5.html

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1  
Great answer! Now if only Amazon would update its ec2 yum packages.. –  bobobobo Nov 11 '13 at 0:26
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I also wondered that long time ago. I searched a bit in my history and I think that this post: http://lists.mysql.com/internals/34919 represents the semi-official position of MySQL (before Oracle's intervention ;))

In short:

this limitation stems only from the way in which this feature is currently implemented in the server and there are no other reasons for its existence.

So their explanation is "because it is implemented like this". Doesn't sound very scientific. I guess it all comes from some old code. This is suggested in the thread above: "carry-over from when only the first timestamp field was auto-set/update".

Cheers!

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Wow, that really stinks. Hope we see a fix soon. –  BoltClock Dec 20 '10 at 13:28
10  
Another great MySQL limitation for us to enjoy! –  Nicolas Buduroi Jan 14 '11 at 4:02
    
Just use trigger to address that, no big deal ... –  gorn Apr 24 '13 at 16:41
    
@gorn the easier solution/work around is the one from Scarlett below. –  tihe May 30 '13 at 8:13
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we can give a default value for the timestamp to avoid this problem. this post give the detail workaround http://gusiev.com/2009/04/update-and-create-timestamps-with-mysql/

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Indeed an implementation fault.

The native approach in MySQL is to update a creation date yourself ( if you need one ) and have MySQL worry about the timestamp update date ? update date : creation date like so:

CREATE TABLE tracked_data( 
  `data` TEXT,
  `timestamp`   TIMESTAMP,
  `creation_date` TIMESTAMP                                   
) ENGINE=INNODB; 

On creation Insert NULL:

INSERT INTO tracked_data(`data`,`creation_date`) VALUES ('creation..',NULL);

NULL values for timestamp are interperted as CURRENT_TIMESTAMP by default.

In MySQL the first TIMESTAMP column of a table gets both DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP and ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP attribute, if no attributes are given for it. this is why TIMESTAMP column with attributes must come first or you get the error described in this thread.

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Not sure but I think the keyword NOW() would also work. –  James Poulson Aug 10 '13 at 22:32
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1.change data types of columns to datetime 2.set trigger such as:

DROP TRIGGER IF EXISTS `update_tablename_trigger`;
DELIMITER //
CREATE TRIGGER `update_tablename_trigger` BEFORE UPDATE ON `tablename`
 FOR EACH ROW SET NEW.`column_name` = NOW()
//
DELIMITER ;
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I've always considered this method much less jankety than the half-implemented CURRENT_TIMESTAMP functionality. –  TehShrike Jul 13 '11 at 17:45
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Well a fix for you could be to put it on the UpdatedDate field and have a trigger that updates the AddedDate field with the UpdatedDate value only if AddedDate is null.

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Try this:

CREATE TABLE `test_table` (
`id` INT( 10 ) NOT NULL,
`created_at` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,
`updated_at` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
) ENGINE = INNODB;
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