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Is it possible to write a method like outType? TryDo(func, out exception, params) that call func(arg1,arg2,arg3,...) which params contains arg1,arg2,arg3,... and then it return func return value and if any exception occurred return null and set the exception?

Can this be done better by another function signature?

for example I have string Foo1(int i) { return i.ToString()}

void Foo2(int[] a) {throw new Exception();}

and then call

string t = TryDo(Foo1, out ex, {i});

TryDo(Foo2, out ex, {});

-----------Edited------------------

        string t;
        SomeClass c;
        try
        {
            t = Foo1(4, 2, new OtherClass());
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Log(ex);
            if (/*ex has some features*/)
                throw ex;
        }

        try
        {
            Foo2();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Log(ex);
            if (/*ex has some features*/)
                throw ex;
        }
        .
        .
        .

I want to make it like this.

        string t = TryDo(Foo1, out ex, {4, 2, new OtherClass());
        Examine(ex);
        SomeClass c = TryDo(Foo2, out ex, {});
        Examine(ex);
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8  
If you have too many try/catch blocks in your code, you're most likely doing something wrong. You should only catch the exceptions you can actually handle and let all other propagate. –  Brian Rasmussen Dec 20 '10 at 13:24
1  
+1 @ Brian Rasmussen. Also, note that catches do not have to be nested if you're handling multiple exceptions from a single method. E.g.: try { /* file i/o */ } catch (AccessDenied ex){} catch (FileNotFound ex){} catch (IOException ex){} // etc –  Greg D Dec 20 '10 at 13:30
    
(And if you're doing some sort of I/O, you're always going to have a lot of error handling if robustness matters) –  Greg D Dec 20 '10 at 13:31
    
@brian: if I determine that the exception should be propagated after that i throw that again, dont try to answering the question by removing it. –  user415789 Dec 20 '10 at 13:32
    
@HPT: Can you give us an example of what "too many try-catch" looks like in the question? –  Greg D Dec 20 '10 at 13:34
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would avoid using out parameters unless absolutely necessary.

Here is a quote from the Design Guidelines for Developing Framework Libraries:

Avoid using out or reference parameters.

Working with members that define out or reference parameters requires that the developer understand pointers, subtle differences between value types and reference types, and initialization differences between out and reference parameters.

You can instead create a return type that wraps the result of your call:

class CallResult<T> where T : class {
  public CallResult(T result) { Result = result; }
  public CallResult(Exception exception) { Exception = exception; }
  public T Result { get; private set; }
  public Exception Exception { get; private set; }
  public Boolean IsSuccessful { get { return Exception == null; } }
}

Your method could then be implemented like this:

CallResult<T> TryDo<T>(Func<Object[], T> action, params Object[] args) where T : class {
  try {
    return new CallResult<T>(action(args));
  }
  catch (Exception ex) {
    return new CallResult<T>(ex);
  }
}

You can call it like this:

var callResult = TryDo<String>(Foo1, 4, 2, new OtherClass());
if (!callResult.IsSuccessful)
  Examine(callResult.Exception);

However, if you intend to rethrow the exception in the Examine method loosing the stacktrace you should really reconsider your approach.

share|improve this answer
    
In general, yes. The bool TrySomething(params, out result); pattern is pretty much the only well-established best-practice I'm aware of in C# with an out parameter. –  Greg D Dec 20 '10 at 13:32
    
@Martin: you are the only one here who try to solve the problem! tnx, If any better solution wouldn't suggest here, I will mark this as an answer. –  user415789 Dec 20 '10 at 14:00
    
@Martin: why avoid using out parameters? –  user415789 Dec 20 '10 at 14:01
1  
out parameters are an error-prone thing in the user-space and generally don't follow industry-standard design guidelines for C# code. –  Greg D Dec 20 '10 at 14:05
    
compile error on Func<Object[], T> Using the generic type System.Func<Tresult> requires 1 type arguments –  user415789 Dec 20 '10 at 14:11
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What you are asking indicates that you have misunderstood how exceptions should be handled. Using try/catch everywhere can produce undesired results and make your application a whole lot harder to debug.

In short, only handle exceptions in the following cases:

  1. You can handle the exception and return promised result
  2. Catch layer specific exceptions and replace them with more generic exceptions (SqlException -> DataSourceException)
  3. Catch all is OK in the top layer
  4. Catch all is OK in threads (since uncaught exceptions in threads will crash your app)

More info in my blog: http://blog.gauffin.org/2010/11/do-not-catch-that-exception/

Update

PLEASE do not use throw ex. You are destroying the original call stack and therefore hiding where the exception was thrown originally. throw; is your puppy. Use it everywhere and all the time.

share|improve this answer
    
I Log the exception if I need to debug. –  user415789 Dec 20 '10 at 13:51
    
throw; throws the exception currently in context without resetting the callstack. This is extremely useful in many debugging scenarios. –  Greg D Dec 20 '10 at 13:57
    
@HPT: Sure. Logging exceptions is one way to get debug information. But if you do try/catch/rethrow everywhere you're likely going to end up logging the same exception multiple times. It will get hard to debug the application as it grows. –  jgauffin Dec 20 '10 at 14:04
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Yes, it's possible.

But why would you like to return a possible exception this way? You could throw further and process at the needed place.

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Yes it is, but why would you want that?

int? TryDo(delegate d, out Exception e, params object[] par)  
{
   try
   {
      int res = d.Invoke(par);
      e = null;
      return res;
   }  
   catch(Exception ex) { e = ex; return null; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it just return int! how about a function that return string or a class? –  user415789 Dec 20 '10 at 13:29
    
d does not have Invoke() it does have DynamicInvoke() –  user415789 Dec 20 '10 at 14:14
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if you are having too many try...catch(I can't understand why) you could go for AOP to centralize the Exception handling.

Below you can find a link that explains how to use it:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/architecture/ExceptionHandlingWithAOP.aspx

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