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Are there some reasons of using Django with PyPy? I read PyPy increases perfomance.

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Real-world performance numbers were discussed on the pypy-dev mailing list recently. I got similar results running a largish site with PyPy 1.7 and psycopg2ct. It seems that currently the ctypes based PostgreSQL drivers (psycopg2ct or pypq) prevent substantial speedups in typical Django apps. Also, you need to take into account the longish warm-up of the JIT. See the thread starting at mail.python.org/pipermail/pypy-dev/2011-October/008499.html –  akaihola Nov 28 '11 at 8:11
    
The psycopg2cffi project seems to have taken database adaptor performance to a new level. See chtd.ru/blog/bystraya-rabota-s-postgres-pod-pypy/?lang=en –  akaihola Aug 4 '13 at 18:40
    
For more information about different options for using PostgreSQL with PyPy, see stackoverflow.com/a/13663976/15770 –  akaihola Aug 4 '13 at 18:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Unlikely. A Django application is almost always I/O-bound, usually because of the database connection. PyPy wouldn't help with that at all, even if it was purely compatible (which I'm not sure it is).

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@Stanislav Feldman: Profile it to see where the bottlenecks are, then go from there. Post the results of profiling here if you need more help. –  Vinay Sajip Dec 20 '10 at 14:28
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Premature optimization is a bad idea. Before you've even started the project is very premature. –  Wooble Dec 20 '10 at 14:50
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I don't see why "optimizing before starting the project" is a bad idea... After all, you have nothing to lose, and the bad decisions you make in the beginning will only increase maintenance burden afterwards. –  Jeeyoung Kim Dec 20 '10 at 20:32
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@Jonathan that chart is misleading at best. If you look at the actual benchmark for Django, it only tests template rendering: which is indeed CPU-dependent, but only a small part of the full request cycle. My comment stands. –  Daniel Roseman Jul 7 '11 at 8:26
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Template rendering is the hardest part in request cycle, assuming your queries are fast enough (in my case all queries complete in less than 10ms, but template rendering is about 100-200ms) –  Ivan Virabyan Aug 2 '11 at 15:54

Depends.

PyPy does improve performance for all benchmarks that are in the PyPy's benchmark suite. This is only template rendering for now, but noone submitted anything else. It's however safe to assume that performance critical code will be faster (especially after some tuning).

Compatibility-wise databases are a bit of an issue, because only sqlite is working and it's slow (there is a branch to fix it though). People also reported pg8000 working with sqlalchemy for example, but I don't have a first-hand experience.

Cheers, fijal

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I have done some experimentation with PyPy + Django. There are two main issues:

  • Most database adaptors and other third-party modules cannot be compiled with PyPy (even when the wiki says they can).

  • One server I thought might benefit from JIT compilation because it did a fancy calculation in some requests had an increasing memory footprint, perhaps because the JIT was storing traces that turned out to be unique to each request so were never reused?

Theoretically PyPy might be a win if your server is doing interesting calculations, uses pure-python modules, and has large numbers of objects in-memory (because PyPy can reduce the memory used per-object in some circumstances). Otherwise the higher memory requirements of the JIT will be an impediment because it reduces opportunities for in-memory caching and may require extra servers to run enough server processes.

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