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Environment

Various applications that use jdbc connection pool: WebLogic 8 (and higher) and Tomcat 6 application servers, various versions of Oracle Database (from 9.2.0.7 to 10.2.0.4) on various platforms (RHEL 5.5, Solaris 9, Solari 10 etc).

I'm trying to understand the meaning of the following entries in the listener log file (notice the frequency):

07-DEC-2010 09:32:30 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SID=<my_sid>)(CID=(PROGRAM=)(HOST=__jdbc__)(USER=<my_user>))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=<my_host>)(PORT=59576)) * establish * <my_sid> * 0
07-DEC-2010 09:32:30 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SID=<my_sid>)(CID=(PROGRAM=)(HOST=__jdbc__)(USER=<my_user>))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=<my_host>)(PORT=59578)) * establish * <my_sid> * 0
07-DEC-2010 09:32:30 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SID=<my_sid>)(CID=(PROGRAM=)(HOST=__jdbc__)(USER=<my_user>))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=<my_host>)(PORT=59577)) * establish * <my_sid> * 0
07-DEC-2010 09:32:30 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SID=<my_sid>)(CID=(PROGRAM=)(HOST=__jdbc__)(USER=<my_user>))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=<my_host>)(PORT=59579)) * establish * <my_sid> * 0
07-DEC-2010 09:32:30 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SID=<my_sid>)(CID=(PROGRAM=)(HOST=__jdbc__)(USER=<my_user>))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=<my_host>)(PORT=59580)) * establish * <my_sid> * 0
07-DEC-2010 09:32:30 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SID=<my_sid>)(CID=(PROGRAM=)(HOST=__jdbc__)(USER=<my_user>))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=<my_host>)(PORT=59581)) * establish * <my_sid> * 0
07-DEC-2010 09:32:30 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SID=<my_sid>)(CID=(PROGRAM=)(HOST=__jdbc__)(USER=<my_user>))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=<my_host>)(PORT=59583)) * establish * <my_sid> * 0
07-DEC-2010 09:32:30 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SID=<my_sid>)(CID=(PROGRAM=)(HOST=__jdbc__)(USER=<my_user>))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=<my_host>)(PORT=59582)) * establish * <my_sid> * 0
07-DEC-2010 09:32:32 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SID=<my_sid>)(CID=(PROGRAM=)(HOST=__jdbc__)(USER=<my_user>))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=<my_host>)(PORT=59589)) * establish * <my_sid> * 0
07-DEC-2010 09:32:43 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SID=<my_sid>)(CID=(PROGRAM=)(HOST=__jdbc__)(USER=<my_user>))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=<my_host>)(PORT=59600)) * establish * <my_sid> * 0
07-DEC-2010 09:32:43 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SID=<my_sid>)(CID=(PROGRAM=)(HOST=__jdbc__)(USER=<my_user>))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=<my_host>)(PORT=59601)) * establish * <my_sid> * 0

All those applications use connection pools, v$session.logon_time reflect the time the connection pool was activated (usually tha application server start time) and the expected number of connections.

So I'm trying to understand what those frequent entries in the listener log represent.

Are these fresh new connections (I suppose they aren't) or they just represent the regular traffic that passes through the existing connections of the connection pool (if this is not the case, I don't understand why the port is changing (I know the listener redirects the client to a free port during the initial handshake, but I don't understand why this is happening after the connection pool is already up)

Could this be sort of heart beat that doesn't use the connection pool?

Unfortunately, in this case, auditing is disabled for application users so I don't have details in dba_audit_trail.

These are some numbers from this particular logfile:

$ tail -1000 listener_<my_sid>.log | awk 'END {
    for (i in count)
  if (count[i] > 10)
    print i, count[i]
}
  /__jdbc__/ {
    sub(/:[^:]*$/, x, $2)
    count[$2]++
  }'
09:14 13
09:17 32
08:45 14
09:19 12
08:49 13
09:32 33
09:35 20
09:37 17
09:38 29
08:30 35
09:03 13
09:05 13
08:33 13
08:51 11
09:24 28

The records are out of order but this is not relevant here, what I'm trying to understand the meaning of these 35 entries per minute.

I observe this behavior in various different java app servers environments on various customer sites and I don't find any abnormal resource usage because of it.

The configured connection pool connections appear correctly in v$session: for instance with 50 x app node (min = max) I see 50 connections x app node in v$session, v$session.logon_time reflects correctly the time the respective app node was started.

That makes me think that even though the OS port changes with every request, somehow those requests are using already established connection pool physical connections.

It would be great if someone else could run the above awk script (just use nawk on Solaris) in a different app environments that use jdbc connection pool, just to compare the numbers.

To be honest, I'm observing the same behavior on all our app environments and just noticed it on two customer sites that are managed by completely different app admins and developers.

And, of course, it's not impossible that there is a common misconfiguration .

===================

Updates: 2011/02/28

More details for one of the environments.

  • 4 WL instances (2 x node)
  • 15 datasources

Configuration:

initial-capacity: 5
max-capacity:     varies, from 20 to 150
capacity-increment: varies, from 1 to 5
connection-reserve-timeout-seconds: 10
test-frequency-seconds: varies, from 120 to 240
inactive-connection-timeout-seconds: 0
seconds-to-trust-an-idle-pool-connection: 10

The information below is for one of the nodes (2 WL instances):

SQL> select sysdate from dual;

SYSDATE
--------------------
28/FEB/2011 12:03:50


SQL> select
  username, machine, logon_time, count(1)
from
  v$session
where
  machine='node1'
group by
  username, machine, logon_time
order by
  1,2,3;    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9   10

USERNAME   MACHINE    LOGON_TIME             COUNT(1)
---------- ---------- -------------------- ----------
C_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 20:25:01          1
C_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 20:25:19          3
C_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 20:25:20          2
C_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 22:45:32          1
C_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 22:45:46          5
C_USER       node1     27/FEB/2011 10:39:42          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 09:25:16          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 10:01:05          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 10:01:06          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 10:23:32          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 10:23:33          6
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 10:23:34          3
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 10:36:09          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 10:46:21          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:00:17          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:00:18          3
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:16:26          2
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:24:07          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:24:08          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:30:32          4
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:30:33          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:43:10          5
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:50:36          9
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:50:37          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:54:16          2
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 11:54:17          2
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 12:01:52          2
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 12:01:54          1
C_USER       node1     28/FEB/2011 12:01:55          4
S_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 20:25:21          1
S_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 22:45:47          1
W_USER       node1     23/FEB/2011 07:03:33          1
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 20:25:05          1
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 20:25:07          5
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 20:25:15          3
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 20:25:16          7
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 20:25:17          1
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 20:25:18          7
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 20:25:19          3
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 22:45:35          1
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 22:45:37          4
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 22:45:38          5
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 22:45:42          5
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 22:45:43          5
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 22:45:44          3
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 22:45:45          7
W_USER       node1     26/FEB/2011 22:45:46          1
W_USER       node1     27/FEB/2011 16:51:48          4

48 rows selected.

$ date
Mon Feb 28 12:19:35 CET 2011
$ tail -5000 listener_<snipped>.log | nawk 'END {
    for (i in count)
  if (count[i] > 10)
    print i, count[i]
}
  /__jdbc__.*HOST=<snipped>/ {
    sub(/:[^:]*$/, x, $2)
    count[$2]++
  }'| sort
07:29 13
08:57 13
09:09 18
09:24 18
09:29 27
09:32 13
09:37 17
09:51 12
10:01 13
10:06 27
10:12 17
10:19 13
10:20 12
10:22 17
10:23 16
10:35 17
11:00 13
11:21 18
11:24 17
11:38 13
11:43 32
11:50 13
11:54 23
12:01 15
12:05 17
12:10 28
12:17 18
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think to make sense of this you will also need to publish the data source configuration from an application server in an environment where this behaviour is experienced.

The data source defines the connection pool, and behaviour in terms of resizing etc.

I believe the parameters used in the data source definition are proprietary, so referring back to the Documentation for the JDBC provider may be necessary - this is most likely Oracle and will be covers inthe Weblogic documentation set.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Yes, the connection pool dynamic resizing is a possible reason. –  Dimitre Radoulov Feb 28 '11 at 11:37

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