Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a large file that I need to pull out only certain pieces of information. I have found a lot of examples on the web, but I cannot get any to work for my particular instance. I have the file data.log (below), and need to pull out all of the Stats1 counters, including the data above. There are multiple instances of these stats. I cannot seem to get a regular expression to match the date AND Stats1, and then read everything up until the three /n/n/n's.... Any help much appreciated!!!

# DATA FILE

Dec 8 20:00:00
Stats1
  counter1:     123
  counter2:     456
  counter3:     789



Dec 8 21:00:00
Stats2
  counter4:     123
  counter5:     456
  counter6:     789



Dec 8 21:00:00
Stats1
  counter1:     123
  counter2:     456
  counter3:     789



Dec 8 21:00:00
Stats2
  counter4:     123
  counter5:     456
  counter6:     789
share|improve this question
3  
What have you got so far? Which part of the problem is giving you trouble? –  Quentin Dec 20 '10 at 18:09

5 Answers 5

Try reading in paragraph mode:

local $/ = "";
while (<>) {
    print "paragraph: $_";
}

I leave figuring out which paragraphs and what processing you want to you.

Output for your sample data:

paragraph: # DATA FILE

paragraph: Dec 8 20:00:00
Stats1
  counter1:     123
  counter2:     456
  counter3:     789

paragraph: Dec 8 21:00:00
Stats2
  counter4:     123
  counter5:     456
  counter6:     789

paragraph: Dec 8 21:00:00
Stats1
  counter1:     123
  counter2:     456
  counter3:     789

paragraph: Dec 8 21:00:00
Stats2
  counter4:     123
  counter5:     456
  counter6:     789
share|improve this answer

I think this achieves what you want

/(.+)\nStats1(?:\n.+){3})/g

It matches the following two dates: Dec 8 20:00:00 and Dec 8 21:00:00

share|improve this answer
    
... assuming you have put the whole document into $_ –  mob Dec 20 '10 at 19:30
    
Sorry, I should have been more clearer. In my mind I new exactly what I meant, but now that I read it... –  Lozwell Dec 20 '10 at 20:06
    
Sorry, I should have been more clearer. In my mind I new exactly what I meant, but now that I read it... I want to only pull the Date (above Stats1), Stats1 Heading and all the Stats1 counters, not any of the Stats2 info. The \n\n\n are the three new lines after each entry. –  Lozwell Dec 20 '10 at 20:15
    
@Lozwell Updated answer to extract only the date. Can you please update the question? –  marcog Dec 20 '10 at 20:22

Edit4: With those comments, here's the hopefully final version:

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;
use Data::Dumper;

my %counter_vals;

{
    local $/ = "\n\n\n";

    while (<DATA>) {
        my ($date) = /(
                     \p{L}{3}
                     \s+
                     (?:3[0-1]|[1-2][0-9]|[1-9]))
                        .*?
                     Stats1/msxg or next;
        my @counter_vals = /counter[0-9]+:\s+([0-9]+)/g;
        push @{$counter_vals{$date}}, @counter_vals;
    } 
}
say Dumper \%counter_vals;
share|improve this answer
    
Please reconcile all your edits into one solution, deleting the non-working code snippets. –  marcog Dec 20 '10 at 20:53
    
They work just fine, only they don't do what the OP had in mind : p But k. –  Hugmeir Dec 20 '10 at 20:58

To be honest, the "best" solution depends on your file. For example:

  • if the file is immense, slurping it all in via <> or $_ might not be wise, whereas if it's "small", that would be fine.
  • does the file have as regular a structure as the the sample shown? In that snippet the blocks occur on a repeating schedule: Stats1 blocks are at lines 3, 19, 35, ..., 3+16n and ending at "7+16n". So it might be as simple as reading the file in and only printing the lines if the line number is between 3 and 7 modulo 16.

On the optimistic assumption that the file is well-structured, it might be as simple as this:

open(IN, "inp.txt") or die;
while (my $line = <IN>)
{
  chomp $line;
  if ( ($. % 16 >= 3) &&
       ($. % 16 <= 7)    )
  {
     print "$line\n";
  }
}
close(IN);
share|improve this answer

Here is a way to do it:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

local $/ = "\n\n\n";
while (<DATA>) {
    print if/Stats1/;
}

__DATA__
Dec 8 20:00:00
Stats1
  counter1:     123
  counter2:     456
  counter3:     789



Dec 8 21:00:00
Stats2
  counter4:     123
  counter5:     456
  counter6:     789



Dec 8 21:00:00
Stats1
  counter1:     123
  counter2:     456
  counter3:     789



Dec 8 21:00:00
Stats2
  counter4:     123
  counter5:     456
  counter6:     789

Output:

Dec 8 20:00:00
Stats1
  counter1:     123
  counter2:     456
  counter3:     789



Dec 8 21:00:00
Stats1
  counter1:     123
  counter2:     456
  counter3:     789
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.