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Still having a hard time grasping some of the harder templates any help would be great.

Right now I am using a simple for-each loop that sorts and shows the data in a table. I want to do the same thing but skip over all the nodes where "State" is = to "Talking Out" below is my current style sheet and below that is my XML. I was thinking I could add a for-each inside of the current loop that ignores the nodes that meet my criteria. I am escaping single quotes since it is part of a larger php script.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

<xsl:template match="/">
  <html>
  <body>
    <table cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" width="390">
      <tr>
        <th style="text-align:left;"><span style="font:20px arial; font-weight:bold;">Agent Name</span></th>
        <th style="text-align:center;"><span style="font:20px arial; font-weight:bold;">State</span></th>
        <th style="text-align:center;"><span style="font:20px arial; font-weight:bold;">Time</span></th>
      </tr>
      <xsl:for-each select="NewDataSet/AgentSales">
<tr>
 <xsl:if test="(position() mod 2 = 1)">
    <xsl:attribute name="bgcolor">#cccccc</xsl:attribute>
    </xsl:if>

 <xsl:if test="AgentSales[State=\'Talking Out\']">

    </xsl:if>

        <td style="text-align:left;"><span style="font:14px arial; font-weight:bold;"><xsl:value-of select="AgentName"/></span></td>
        <td style="text-align:center;"><span style="font:14px arial; font-weight:bold;"><xsl:value-of select="State"/></span></td>
    <td style="text-align:center;"><span style="font:14px arial; font-weight:bold;"><xsl:value-of select="time"/></span></td>
</tr>   

      </xsl:for-each>
    </table>
  </body>
  </html>
</xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

here is my XML

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<NewDataSet>
  <AgentSales>
    <AgentName>MCCALLISTER AARON</AgentName>
    <State>Talking Out</State>
    <Reason />
    <time>9</time>
  </AgentSales>
  <AgentSales>
    <AgentName>APPELHANS BARRY</AgentName>
    <State>Talking Out</State>
    <Reason />
    <time>1</time>
  </AgentSales>
  <AgentSales>
    <AgentName>ARREDONDO KARLA</AgentName>
    <State>Talking Out</State>
    <Reason />
    <time>0</time>
  </AgentSales>
  <AgentSales>
    <AgentName>WOOTERS CHAD</AgentName>
    <State>Talking In</State>
    <Reason />
    <time>5</time>
  </AgentSales>
  <AgentSales>
    <AgentName>LANDINI EUGENE</AgentName>
    <State>Not Ready</State>
    <Reason>TRAINING</Reason>
    <time>16</time>
  </AgentSales>
  <AgentSales>
    <AgentName>BROWN EYES JONETTE</AgentName>
    <State>Not Ready</State>
    <Reason>TRAINING</Reason>
    <time>13</time>
  </AgentSales>
</NewDataSet>
share|improve this question
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a very small correction to your code that achieves the desired new behavior. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 20 '10 at 19:08
    
How this is different form Rotate <TR> background color without using for-each ? –  user357812 Dec 20 '10 at 19:28
    
@Alejandro I already had the For Loop working out then i realized I didn't want the Talking Out. I am still wrapping my head around XSL. So you will have to excuse me if I ask a question twice. –  Denoteone Dec 21 '10 at 4:18
    
SO works as a knowledge source driven by Q&A, that's why duplicate questions harm learning opportunity for others. –  user357812 Dec 21 '10 at 12:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While "apply-templates" may seem uncomfortable compared to "for-each", perhaps this example can show you its power...

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <html>
            <body>
                <table cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" width="390">
                    <tr>
                        <th style="text-align:left;"><span style="font:20px arial; font-weight:bold;">Agent Name</span></th>
                        <th style="text-align:center;"><span style="font:20px arial; font-weight:bold;">State</span></th>
                        <th style="text-align:center;"><span style="font:20px arial; font-weight:bold;">Time</span></th>
                    </tr>
                    <xsl:apply-templates select="NewDataSet/AgentSales[State!='Talking Out']"/>
                </table>
            </body>
        </html>
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="AgentSales">
        <tr>
            <xsl:if test="(position() mod 2 = 1)">
                <xsl:attribute name="bgcolor">#cccccc</xsl:attribute>
            </xsl:if>
            <td style="text-align:left;"><span style="font:14px arial; font-weight:bold;"><xsl:value-of select="AgentName"/></span></td>
            <td style="text-align:center;"><span style="font:14px arial; font-weight:bold;"><xsl:value-of select="State"/></span></td>
            <td style="text-align:center;"><span style="font:14px arial; font-weight:bold;"><xsl:value-of select="time"/></span></td>
        </tr>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
so "<xsl:apply-templates select="NewDataSet/AgentSales[State!='Talking Out']"/>" says all other templates go here and only if they are not talking out? I am having a hard time getting my head around the order things are styled. I have been asking everyone this but if you have any online resources that assist with learning XSLT I would really appreciate if you would share. Thanks! –  Denoteone Dec 20 '10 at 19:05
    
@Denoteone: For XSLT learning resources see my answer to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/339930/… –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 20 '10 at 19:17
1  
@Denotenone: A good strategy is to get yourself a good debugger and experiment with examples from some of the sources Dimitre suggests. I like Oxygen from oxygenxml.com. –  dacracot Dec 20 '10 at 19:30
    
Thanks for the advise. –  Denoteone Dec 21 '10 at 4:27

Right now I am using a simple for-each loop that sorts and shows the data in a table. I want to do the same thing but skip over all the nodes where "State" is = to "Talking Out"

Just replace:

  <xsl:for-each select="NewDataSet/AgentSales">

with

<xsl:for-each select="NewDataSet/AgentSales[not(State='Talking Out')]">
share|improve this answer
    
Can I ask, why do you prefer not() to != operator in string-value comparisons? Just a question of style or something more? –  Flack Dec 20 '10 at 20:30
    
@Flack: Because one should not use the != operator -- this is too risky. To avoid the risk of using it in general (node-set) comparisons, simply never use it. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 20 '10 at 20:34
1  
@Flack: State != 'Talking Out' means "there is a State child element whose value is not equal to 'Talking Out'", while not(State = 'Talking Out') means "there is no State child element whose value is equal to 'Talking Out'". The difference is confusing. –  LarsH Dec 20 '10 at 21:26

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