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I need an answer so i can explore. I am running into a brick wall here:

I would like to use:

        for (int c = 0; c < 255; c++)
        {

            Color = Color.FromArgb(255, (byte)c, (byte)(255 - c), (byte)c);
            Thread.Sleep(3);
        }

Each time the "Color" is recomputed, i would like the Window or the Canvas in the Window to IMMEDIATELY change color...so i get to SEE the cool color changes. Why is this so hard? I need to see this, but i'm hitting a brick wall. I copied a Type Converter here:

[ValueConversion(typeof(Color),typeof(SolidColorBrush))]
public class ColorBrushConverter : IValueConverter
{


    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        Color color = (Color)value;
        return new SolidColorBrush(color);
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return null;
    }

}

THANK YOU FOR ANY HELP!

share|improve this question

A simple example of how you can bind a Color Property from code behind to a Canvas Background. Things to note

  • Implement INotifyPropertyChanged. The Background for the Canvas will get updated upon OnPropertyChanged which will execute everytime MyColorProperty changes.
  • Setting the DataContext = this; in the constructor will make all Controls in Window inherit this DataContext (unless this is overriden).

xaml

<Canvas ...>
    <Canvas.Background>
        <SolidColorBrush Color="{Binding MyColorProperty}"/>
    </Canvas.Background>

Code behind

public partial class MainWindow : Window, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        this.DataContext = this;
    }

    // ...

    private Color m_myColorProperty;
    public Color MyColorProperty
    {
        get
        {
            return m_myColorProperty;
        }
        set
        {
            m_myColorProperty = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("MyColorProperty");
        }
    }
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    private void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }

    private void SwitchBackground()
    {
        if (MyColorProperty == Colors.Red)
        {
            MyColorProperty = Colors.Black;
        }
        else
        {
            MyColorProperty = Colors.Red;
        }
    }
}

Update
To run the Background animation you can use a BackgroundWorker like this

private BackgroundWorker m_changeColorBgWorker = null;

public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    this.DataContext = this;
    m_changeColorBgWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
    m_changeColorBgWorker.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(m_changeColorBgWorker_DoWork);
}
private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    if (m_changeColorBgWorker.IsBusy == false)
    {
        m_changeColorBgWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }
}
void m_changeColorBgWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    while (true)
    {
        for (int c = 0; c < 254; c++)
        {
            MyColorProperty = Color.FromArgb(255, (byte)c, (byte)(255 - c), (byte)c);
            Thread.Sleep(10); 
        }
    }
}

You can set the MyColorProperty directly in the thread because changes fired by INotifyPropertyChanged are automatically marshalled back onto the dispatcher. This does not go for INotifyCollectionChanged however, just so you know.

share|improve this answer
    
That works great! Now, if i want to run this: – woops Dec 20 '10 at 21:23
    
while (true) { for (int c = 0; c < 254; c++) { MyColorProperty = Color.FromArgb(255, (byte)c, (byte)(255 - c), (byte)c); } } – woops Dec 20 '10 at 21:23
    
how do i get the window to update after each property change??? – woops Dec 20 '10 at 21:24
    
@woops: Updated my answer – Fredrik Hedblad Dec 20 '10 at 21:32
    
Thank you. Please see: charlespetzold.com/blog/2008/11/030337.html This works without threading, but uses the AffectRender Framework options in dependent property. I could never adapt this to my just wanting to run a for loop of color changes in a canvas background. – woops Dec 21 '10 at 2:41

You're doing this in the UI thread. If you block the UI thread with Thread.Sleep, the UI blocks as well (and no changes are applied).

The solution is to use a Timer instead of a loop. Save c in some instance variable of your window. Set a timer that expires after 3 ms, increases c, changes Color and then resets the timer to go off again in 3 ms.

Alternatively, you could start a background thread that loops (and uses Thread.Sleep). In that case, you must apply the Color change through Dispatcher.Invoke instead of simply setting Color = ....


To illustrate my point, here's a quick example of how to do it with a background thread:

// define the background thread
var colorChangeThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(() => {
    for (int c = 0; c < 255; c++)
    {  
        // this (and only this) is done in the UI thread
        Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() => {
            this.Background = new SolidColorBrush(Color.FromArgb(255, (byte)c, (byte)(255 - c), (byte)c)); 
        }));

        Thread.Sleep(8);    // the background thread waits
    }
}));
colorChangeThread.Start();  // start the background thread

If you are using properties with INotifyPropertyChanged, you can skip the Dispatcher.Invoke and just set your property, see the explanation in Meleaks answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello, thanks for your answer. I'm looking for the basic plumbing. I can do the timer thing so the colors don't change so fast i can't see them. I'm having trouble getting the background to change color dynamically. – woops Dec 20 '10 at 19:22
    
@woops: I don't really understand... where is the problem with the timer approach? – Heinzi Dec 20 '10 at 19:23
    
its not the timer approach at all. take the timer out of the picture completely. How do i databind a color generated in code to a window.background or canvas.background and the screen updates immediately to show the new color background? – woops Dec 20 '10 at 19:33
    
In other words, i can just set up an infinite loops instead of thread sleep to see the color changes. – woops Dec 20 '10 at 19:44
    
@woops: That's the whole point I was trying to make: The screen only updates if your code is not running, that's why you need techniques such as a timer or a background thread. It won't work with just a loop, with or without sleep. – Heinzi Dec 20 '10 at 21:32

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