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I am getting a warning of "assigment from incompatible pointer type". I don't understand why this warning is happening. I don't know what else to declare "the_go_status" variable to other than an integer. (Note: this is not all the code, but just a simplified version I posted to illustrate the problem.)

The warning occurs on the last line of the example I included below.

//In a header file  
enum error_type  
{  
    ERR_1 = 0,  
    ERR_2 = 1,  
    ERR_3 = 2,  
    ERR_4 = 4,  
};  


//In a header file  
struct error_struct  
{  
   int value;  
   enum error_type *status;  
};  



//In a C file  
int the_go_status;  

the_go_status = ERR_1;  

//Have the error_struct "status" point to the address of "the_go_status"  
error_struct.status = &the_go_status;    //WARNING HERE!
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6 Answers 6

Because status is a pointer to enum error_type, and the_go_status is a pointer to an int. They are pointers to different types.

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This is true, but what he wants to do seems, and I can't believe I'm finally seeing this as the best phrase to describe it, awfully smelly. –  San Jacinto Dec 20 '10 at 19:45
    
the_go_status is not a pointer, it's a primitive –  codeySmurf Dec 20 '10 at 19:52
    
codeySmurt: Yes, you are correct. &the_go_status is a pointer to an int. –  Jonathan Wood Dec 20 '10 at 19:54
    
to be more specific &the_go_status is the address to what the pointer, if it had been declared, points. –  codeySmurf Dec 21 '10 at 2:15
    
So, for int * pointer; pointer = &anotherPointer you may set a pointer to the address of the other pointer and therefore to that value. –  codeySmurf Dec 21 '10 at 2:20
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I'm not sure if this is related exactly to your warning or not, but be very careful assigning references to local variables to pointers within structs. If the_go_status is a local, as soon as your function returns, the reference to that local will become invalid. So, if your code (or someone else's code) uses your instance of error_struct outside the function declaring the_go_status, things will quickly break.

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This is because enum error_type * isn't compatible with int *, because they point to values of different types (and possibly even different sizes). You should declare the_go_status as:

enum error_type the_go_status;

Although simply casting the pointer (i.e. (enum error_type *)&the_go_status) will make the warning go away, it may result in bugs on some platforms. See Is the sizeof(enum) == sizeof(int), always?

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Try this:

#include <stdio.h>


enum error_type
{
    ERR_1=0
    ,ERR_2=1
    ,ERR_3=2
    ,ERR_4=4
};

struct error_struct
{
    int value;
    error_type status;

};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    printf("Start\n");

    error_type the_go_status=ERR_1;
    error_struct err;

    err.value=5;
    err.status=the_go_status;


    printf("Done\n");

    getchar();


    return 0;
}
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you should declare a pointer if you want to use a pointer:

int * the_go_status

otherwise you declare a primitive, which is not placed on the heap, but on the stack. (please correct my when being wrong on that)

However, I don't get why you want to use a pointer at all. Just do something like this in your struct definition:

enum error_type status;

and change your last line to:

error_struct.status = the_go_status; 
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Just declaring a pointer doesn't do any good, you have to point it at something. –  Chris Stratton Dec 20 '10 at 21:13
1  
true. As for any other kind of "variable", you have to set it once, so it has a value. However, as this is one of the most basic things of programming, I assumed this being obvious –  codeySmurf Dec 21 '10 at 2:13
    
Thanks, this helped! –  ArtSabintsev Dec 5 '11 at 19:22
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The "the_go_status" should be typed "enum error_type". You could typedef the enum

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