Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How does one use XPath to find the deepest node that matches a string content length constraint.

Given a chunk of XHTML (or XML) that looks like this:

<html>
    <body>
        <div id="page">
             <div id="desc">
                  This wool sweater has the following features:
                  <ul>
                       <li>4 buttons</li>
                       <li>Merino Wool</li>
                  </ul>
             </div>
        </div>
        ...
     </body>
</html>

An an XPath expression like

//*[string-length() > 50]

Would match the <html>, <body>, <div id="page"> and <div id="desc">. How can one make XPath pick the deepest matching node (ie: <div id="desc">)?

Bonus points, how does one apply the constraint to space normalized content length?

share|improve this question
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for an explanation and an XSLT 1.0 and XPath 2.0 solutions. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 20 '10 at 20:25
    
Slight clarification which is already reflected in some of the answers. What I was looking for is the deepest node(s) that match the constraint. Dividing the node depth by string length for example produces such a score. –  Pasha Sadri Dec 20 '10 at 22:23
    
What about nodes of the same depth? –  user357812 Dec 21 '10 at 12:53

2 Answers 2

This cannot be expressed as a single XPath 1.0 expression (not using variables)

A single XPath 2.0 expression:

//*[string-length(.) > 50]
      [count(ancestor::*) >= //*[string-length(.) > 50]/count(ancestor::*)]

An XPath 1.0 expression using a variable:

//*[string-length() > 50]
         [not(//*[string-length() > 50 
        and count(ancestor::*) > $vNumAncestrors])
         ]

where the variable vNumAncestrors holds the value of count(ancestor::*) for the context node.

The latter expression can be implemented in a hosting language, such as XSLT 1.0 or DOM.

Here is one XSLT 1.0 implementation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/*">
  <xsl:variable name="vLongTextElements"
   select="//*[string-length()>50]"/>

  <xsl:for-each select="$vLongTextElements">
   <xsl:variable name="vNumAncestrors"
        select="count(ancestor::*)"/>

    <xsl:copy-of select=
    "(.)[not(//*[string-length() > 50
            and count(ancestor::*) > $vNumAncestrors])
         ]
    "/>
  </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<html>
    <body>
        <div id="page">
            <div id="desc">                                This wool sweater has the following features:                                
                <ul>
                    <li>4 buttons</li>
                    <li>Merino Wool</li>
                </ul>
            </div>
        </div>                      ...                   
    </body>
</html>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<div id="desc">                                This wool sweater has the following features:                                
                <ul>

      <li>4 buttons</li>

      <li>Merino Wool</li>

   </ul>

</div>

Bonus points, how does one apply the constraint to space normalized content length?

Very simple to implement atop of the last solution:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/*">
  <xsl:variable name="vLongTextElements"
   select="//*[string-length(normalize-space())>50]"/>

  <xsl:for-each select="$vLongTextElements">
   <xsl:variable name="vNumAncestrors"
        select="count(ancestor::*)"/>

    <xsl:copy-of select=
    "(.)[not(//*[string-length(normalize-space()) > 50
            and count(ancestor::*) > $vNumAncestrors])
         ]
    "/>
  </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

And the initial XPath 2.0 expression is now modified to this one:

//*[string-length(normalize-space(.)) > 50]
      [count(ancestor::*) 
     >= 
      //*[string-length(normalize-space(.)) > 50]/count(ancestor::*)
      ]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good and complete answer. –  user357812 Dec 20 '10 at 23:48

As Dimitre have pointed out, the problem for solving this in XPath 1.0 is that maximum expression works only for not calculated values:

$node-set[not($node-set/node-or-attribute > node-or-attribute)]

That's why in XSLT 1.0 you would use the "standar" maximum construction:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <xsl:for-each select="//*[string-length(normalize-space())>50]">
            <xsl:sort select="count(ancestor::*)" 
                      data-type="number" order="descending"/>
            <xsl:if test="position()=1">
                <xsl:copy-of select="."/>
            </xsl:if>
        </xsl:for-each>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Output:

<div id="desc">                   This wool sweater has the following features:                   
                <ul>
<li>4 buttons</li>
<li>Merino Wool</li>
</ul>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Nice work with sort. –  Flack Dec 20 '10 at 22:21
1  
+1, but there's something minor I'm sure you know about: This solution outputs only one of the possibly many elements with the desired property. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 21 '10 at 2:42
    
@Dimitre: Good point! I'd asked the OP what should be the intented behavior. –  user357812 Dec 21 '10 at 12:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.