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I have a problem where I am trying to create a neural network for Tic-Tac-Toe. However, for some reason, training the neural network causes it to produce nearly the same output for any given input.

I did take a look at Artificial neural networks benchmark, but my network implementation is built for neurons with the same activation function for each neuron, i.e. no constant neurons.

To make sure the problem wasn't just due to my choice of training set (1218 board states and moves generated by a genetic algorithm), I tried to train the network to reproduce XOR. The logistic activation function was used. Instead of using the derivative, I multiplied the error by output*(1-output) as some sources suggested that this was equivalent to using the derivative. I can put the Haskell source on HPaste, but it's a little embarrassing to look at. The network has 3 layers: the first layer has 2 inputs and 4 outputs, the second has 4 inputs and 1 output, and the third has 1 output. Increasing to 4 neurons in the second layer didn't help, and neither did increasing to 8 outputs in the first layer.

I then calculated errors, network output, bias updates, and the weight updates by hand based on http://hebb.mit.edu/courses/9.641/2002/lectures/lecture04.pdf to make sure there wasn't an error in those parts of the code (there wasn't, but I will probably do it again just to make sure). Because I am using batch training, I did not multiply by x in equation (4) there. I am adding the weight change, though http://www.faqs.org/faqs/ai-faq/neural-nets/part2/section-2.html suggests to subtract it instead.

The problem persisted, even in this simplified network. For example, these are the results after 500 epochs of batch training and of incremental training.

Input    |Target|Output (Batch)      |Output(Incremental)
[1.0,1.0]|[0.0] |[0.5003781562785173]|[0.5009731800870864]
[1.0,0.0]|[1.0] |[0.5003740346965251]|[0.5006347214672715]
[0.0,1.0]|[1.0] |[0.5003734471544522]|[0.500589332376345]
[0.0,0.0]|[0.0] |[0.5003674110937019]|[0.500095157458231]

Subtracting instead of adding produces the same problem, except everything is 0.99 something instead of 0.50 something. 5000 epochs produces the same result, except the batch-trained network returns exactly 0.5 for each case. (Heck, even 10,000 epochs didn't work for batch training.)

Is there anything in general that could produce this behavior?

Also, I looked at the intermediate errors for incremental training, and the although the inputs of the hidden/input layers varied, the error for the output neuron was always +/-0.12. For batch training, the errors were increasing, but extremely slowly and the errors were all extremely small (x10^-7). Different initial random weights and biases made no difference, either.

Note that this is a school project, so hints/guides would be more helpful. Although reinventing the wheel and making my own network (in a language I don't know well!) was a horrible idea, I felt it would be more appropriate for a school project (so I know what's going on...in theory, at least. There doesn't seem to be a computer science teacher at my school).

EDIT: Two layers, an input layer of 2 inputs to 8 outputs, and an output layer of 8 inputs to 1 output, produces much the same results: 0.5+/-0.2 (or so) for each training case. I'm also playing around with pyBrain, seeing if any network structure there will work.

Edit 2: I am using a learning rate of 0.1. Sorry for forgetting about that.

Edit 3: Pybrain's "trainUntilConvergence" doesn't get me a fully trained network, either, but 20000 epochs does, with 16 neurons in the hidden layer. 10000 epochs and 4 neurons, not so much, but close. So, in Haskell, with the input layer having 2 inputs & 2 outputs, hidden layer with 2 inputs and 8 outputs, and output layer with 8 inputs and 1 output...I get the same problem with 10000 epochs. And with 20000 epochs.

Edit 4: I ran the network by hand again based on the MIT PDF above, and the values match, so the code should be correct unless I am misunderstanding those equations.

Some of my source code is at http://hpaste.org/42453/neural_network__not_working; I'm working on cleaning my code somewhat and putting it in a Github (rather than a private Bitbucket) repository.

All of the relevant source code is now at https://github.com/l33tnerd/hsann.

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Kudos to you for taking this on; sounds like an interesting project. I'd initially suspect that your network has too many layers; backprop isn't great for that many layers. In your example, what is your last layer of a single node with a single input and output actually supposed to do? –  Paul Sonier Dec 20 '10 at 20:35
    
@McWafflestix: Well...not much, I guess. But then again, changing it so it had 4 inputs and 1 output didn't do much for the network either. –  li.davidm Dec 20 '10 at 20:43
    
What learning rate did you use? –  finnw Dec 20 '10 at 20:59
    
@finnw: I used 0.1. –  li.davidm Dec 20 '10 at 21:07

6 Answers 6

Based on your comments, I'd agree with @finnw that you have a bias problem. You should treat the bias as a constant "1" (or -1 if you prefer) input to each neuron. Each neuron will also have its own weight for the bias, so a neuron's output should be the sum of the weighted inputs, plus the bias times its weight, passed through the activation function. Bias weights are updated during training just like the other weights.

Fausett's "Fundamentals of Neural Networks" (p.300) has an XOR example using binary inputs and a network with 2 inputs, 1 hidden layer of 4 neurons and one output neuron. Weights are randomly initialized between +0.5 and -0.5. With a learning rate of 0.02 the example network converges after about 3000 epochs. You should be able to get a result in the same ballpark if you get the bias problems (and any other bugs) ironed out.

Also note that you cannot solve the XOR problem without a hidden layer in your network.

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It's hard to tell without seeing a code sample, but a bias bug can have that effect (e.g. forgetting to add the bias to the input), so I would take a closer look at that part of the code.

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I am adding the bias to the sum of the weighted inputs...but the source I used is ambiguous: should I add the bias to each weighted input? I don't think so, however. –  li.davidm Dec 20 '10 at 21:08

It's hard to tell without seeing a code sample but it is possible occure for a net because its number of hidden neron.with incresing in number of neron and number of hiden layer it is not possible to train a net with small set of training data.until it is possible to make a net with smaller layer and nerons it is amiss to use a larger net.therefore perhaps your problem solved with attention to this matters.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I haven't tested it with the XOR problem in the question, but for my original dataset based on Tic-Tac-Toe, I believe that I have gotten the network to train somewhat (I only ran 1000 epochs, which wasn't enough): the quickpropagation network can win/tie over half of its games; backpropagation can get about 41%. The problems came down to implementation errors (small ones) and not understanding the difference between the error derivative (which is per-weight) and the error for each neuron, which I did not pick up on in my research. @darkcanuck's answer about training the bias similarly to a weight would probably have helped, though I didn't implement it. I also rewrote my code in Python so that I could more easily hack with it. Therefore, although I haven't gotten the network to match the minimax algorithm's efficiency, I believe that I have managed to solve the problem.

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I'm having the same problem with my network. Can you tell me how you solved the problem or what was causing it? –  Hex4869 Dec 28 '13 at 9:33
    
@Hex4869 Sorry, I never really got it to work. I would recommend looking for sample code and/or asking your own question. –  li.davidm Dec 28 '13 at 15:13

I've had similar problems, but was able to solve by changing these:

  • Scale down the problem to manageable size. I first tried too many inputs, with too many hidden layer units. Once I scaled down the problem, I could see if the solution to the smaller problem was working. This also works because when it's scaled down, the times to compute the weights drop down significantly, so I can try many different things without waiting.
  • Make sure you have enough hidden units. This was a major problem for me. I had about 900 inputs connecting to ~10 units in the hidden layer. This was way too small to quickly converge. But also became very slow if I added additional units. Scaling down the number of inputs helped a lot.
  • Change the activation function and its parameters. I was using tanh at first. I tried other functions: sigmoid, normalized sigmoid, Gaussian, etc.. I also found that changing the function parameters to make the functions steeper or shallower affected how quickly the network converged.
  • Change learning algorithm parameters. Try different learning rates (0.01 to 0.9). Also try different momentum parameters, if your algo supports it (0.1 to 0.9).

Hope this helps those who find this thread on Google!

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I've had similar problems with machine learning algorithms and when I looked at the code I found random generators that were not really random. If you do not use a new random seed (such Unix time for example, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_time) then it is possible to get the exact same results over and over again.

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