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I have created a query in MS Access to simulate a FULL OUTER JOIN and combine the results that looks something like the following:

SELECT NZ(estimates.employee_id, actuals.employee_id) AS employee_id
, NZ(estimates.a_date, actuals.a_date) AS a_date
, estimates.estimated_hours
, actuals.actual_hours
FROM (SELECT *
      FROM estimates
      LEFT JOIN actuals ON estimates.employee_id = actuals.employee_id
         AND estimates.a_date = actuals.a_date
      UNION ALL
      SELECT *
      FROM estimates
      RIGHT JOIN actuals ON estimates.employee_id = actuals.employee_id
         AND estimates.a_date = actuals.a_date
      WHERE estimates.employee_id IS NULL
         OR estimates.a_date IS NULL) AS qFullJoinEstimatesActuals

I have saved this query as an object (let's call it qEstimatesAndActuals). My objective is to LEFT JOIN qEstimatesAndActuals with another table. Something like the following:

SELECT *
FROM qJoinedTable
LEFT JOIN (SELECT *
           FROM labor_rates) AS rates
ON qJoinedTable.employee_id = rates.employee_id
   AND qJoinedTable.a_date BETWEEN rates.begin_date AND rates.end_date

MS Access accepts the syntax and runs the query, but it omits results that are clearly within the result set. Wondering if the date format was somehow lost, I placed a FORMAT around the begin_date and end_date to force them to be interpreted as Short Dates. Oddly, this produced a different result set, but it still omitted result that it shouldn't have.

I am wondering if the queries are performed in such a way that you can't LEFT JOIN the result set of a UNION ALL. Does anyone have any thoughts/ideas on this? Is there a better way of accomplishing the end goal?

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3 Answers 3

I would try breaking each part of the query into its own access query object, e.g.

SELECT *
  FROM estimates
  LEFT JOIN actuals ON estimates.employee_id = actuals.employee_id
     AND estimates.a_date = actuals.a_date

Would be qryOne

SELECT *
  FROM estimates
  RIGHT JOIN actuals ON estimates.employee_id = actuals.employee_id
     AND estimates.a_date = actuals.a_date
  WHERE estimates.employee_id IS NULL
     OR estimates.a_date IS NULL

Would be qryTwo

SELECT * FROM qryOne
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM qryTwo

Would be qryFullJoinEstimatesActuals, and finally

SELECT NZ(estimates.employee_id, actuals.employee_id) AS employee_id
, NZ(estimates.a_date, actuals.a_date) AS a_date
, estimates.estimated_hours
, actuals.actual_hours
FROM qryFullJoinEstimatesActuals

I've found that constructs that don't work in complex Access SQL statements often do work properly if they are broken down into individual query objects and reassembled step-by-step. Additionally, you can test each part of the query individually. This will help you find a workaround if one proves to be necessary.

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Thanks for the tip. Although this wasn't the root issue, it (a) caused me to stumble across another unrelated error that would have been an issue later and (b) helped focus me in on what was causing the problem. –  Adam Dec 20 '10 at 23:37

You can find exactly how to do this here.

You're missing an INNER JOIN.... UNION ALL step.

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The article you have referenced was used as the basis for the FULL JOIN (although I modified the syntax to remove the redundancy of using the INNER JOIN - as some of those who commented on the article alluded could be done). However, the syntax to create a FULL JOIN is not the issue I'm having. The issue I have described above refers to the result set that is produced when the result set of the FULL JOIN (which works by itself) is combined with a LEFT JOIN. –  Adam Dec 20 '10 at 22:26
    
Take a look at the Venn Diagram from the article. As the article is written, the author uses three queries to obtain Set 1 (INNER JOIN), Set 2 (LEFT JOIN with a WHERE clause to remove Set 1 results), and Set 3 (RIGHT JOIN with a WHERE clause to remove Set 1 results) and uses two UNION ALLs to combine them. This can be accomplished more simply by using two queries, the first to obtain sets 1 and 2 (LEFT JOIN without a WHERE clause to remove Set 1 results) and the second to get set 3 (RIGHT JOIN with a WHERE clause to remove Set 1 results) and using one UNION ALL to combine them. –  Adam Dec 21 '10 at 16:53
    
@Adam thanks. Out of curiosity, why don't you use SQL Server? –  IanC Dec 21 '10 at 16:56
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Consistent with the odd behavior surrounding the dates, this issue turned out to be related to the use of NZ to select a date from qFullJoinEstimatesActuals. The use of NZ appears to make the data type ambiguous. As such, the following line from the example in my post caused the error:

, NZ(estimates.a_date, actuals.a_date) AS a_date

The ambiguous data type of a_date caused the BETWEEN operator to produce erroneous results when comparing a_date to rates.begin_date and rates.end_date in the LEFT JOIN. The issue was resolved by type casting the result of the NZ function, as follows:

, CDate(NZ(estimates.a_date, actuals.a_date)) AS a_date
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I've also been frustrated by the unreliability of return types with Nz(), but by definition, you're expecting one of the arguments to be Null at least some of the time, which means the function would need to guess at the return type or examine metadata about the source data. So, you have to do it yourself. That said, a join on an Nz() expression strikes me as problematic, since it can't use indexes. –  David-W-Fenton Dec 21 '10 at 2:32
    
The article this is based on shown to UNION ALLs, which makes sense. You have only one. How can you be getting all the results? –  IanC Dec 21 '10 at 4:31
    
@David-W-Fenton That certainly makes sense. As for the design concern, do you have another suggestion? With a slight simplification, there are two tables: (1) an estimates table with an employee_id, a week_end_date, and the projected_hours and (2) an actuals table with an employee_id, a week_end_date, and the actual_hours. There can be employees who are projected to work, but do not. Similarly, there can be employees who were not projected to work, but do. Objective: Get employee_id, week_end_date, projected_hours, actual_hours into a single queryable object. E.g., 001, 9/26/2010, 0, 10 –  Adam Dec 21 '10 at 16:39
    
@IanC See the comment I added below your answer - I have added an explanation of how the article approached the FULL JOIN versus how it is done in the example in this post. –  Adam Dec 21 '10 at 16:56
    
My eyes glaze over when I look at raw SQL and can't interact with the data directly, so I can't say I can see an obviously better solution. However, any time I see UNION used extensively, it spells trouble for me, especially if you are required to join to a UNION, since you can't use indexes. It might be more efficient to JOIN the two tables and then UNION multiple instances of that JOIN, since that would at least use indexes (assuming an equi-JOIN and not on an expression). –  David-W-Fenton Dec 24 '10 at 2:24

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