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I was recently in a C++ technical interview, where I was given a bit of simple string manipulation code, which is intended to take a string and return a string that is comprised of the first and last n-characters, and then proceed to correct any bugs and to also make the function as efficient as possible, I came up with the solution below, however the interviewer claimed there was an even faster more optimal way:

Original code:

std::string first_last_n(int n, std::string s)
{
   std::string first_n = s.substr(0,n);
   std::string last_n = s.substr(s.size()-n-1,n);
   return first_n + last_n;
}

My code:

bool first_last_n(const std::size_t& n, const std::string& s, std::string& r)
{
   if (s.size() < n)
      return false;
   r.reserve(2 * n);
   r.resize(0);
   r.append(s.data(),s.data() + n);
   r.append(s.data() + (s.size() - n), s.data() + s.size());
   return true;
}

Summary of my changes:

  • Changed the interface to take a return string as reference (assuming RVO and rvalues are not available yet)

  • Removed temporary strings being constructed via substr

  • Passed input string as a const reference inorder to get around temporary instantiation of input

  • Fixed off-by-1 error in last_n string

  • Reduced the number of times each character is touched down to once, or twice (in the event of an overlapping scenario)

  • Placed a check in the event the string s's size is less than n, returning false for failure.

Assuming only native C++ is allowed, is there some other way of doing the above more efficiently or optimally?

Note 1: The original input string instance is not to be modified.

Note 2: All solutions must pass the following test case, otherwise they are not valid.

void test()
{
   {
      std::string s = "0123456789";
      std::string r = first_last_n(10,s);
      assert(r == "01234567890123456789");
   }

   {
      std::string s = "0123456789ABC0123456789";
      std::string r = first_last_n(10,s);
      assert(r == "01234567890123456789");
   }

   {
      std::string s = "1234321";
      std::string r = first_last_n(5,s);
      assert(r == "1234334321");
   }

}
share|improve this question
2  
You can only guess (or physically measure) at which one is optimal as they will both be affected by the actual underlying implementation of std::string. Personally I prefer the first one as it is intuitively easy to read. But if this was designed for reuse in a library (like the STL) I would go for the second one (iff I could prove there was some real advantage). The advantage of the second was is the use of reserve to make sure there is not too much copying involved. Also note: copying back a string is not as expensive as you imagine as most implementations use copy on write. –  Loki Astari Dec 20 '10 at 23:18
2  
@Zenikoder: In practice that will work fine on any "normal" C++ library implementation, but you should be aware that there is no requirement that c_str() give you back an in-place representation of the string -- it is allowed to make a copy, in which case your several calls to it would make things slower. (The motivation for this is that in theory the string library might not null-terminate its internal representation. I'm 99% confident no library does this however as it would mean opening an memory management can of worms.) –  j_random_hacker Dec 20 '10 at 23:48
3  
@j_random_hacker: I agree about that rule regarding c_str, but in practise and reality, is there a faster way to implement c_str than how its being done today? –  Matthieu N. Dec 20 '10 at 23:50
4  
@Martin: I don't think gcc 4.4 or vs 9.0 or vs 10.0 to be "experimental" compilers - they don't support COW in their std::string implementation, supporting COW for std::string causes more inefficiencies and problems than it resolves, its been like that for a while now, memory is cheap yada yada. btw Martin if you think there's an STL that does, could you please provide a version and possible a file/line number that i can have a quick look at, i've got access to most C++ compilers available (excluding hpux platform) –  Matthieu N. Dec 21 '10 at 0:22
3  
@Mike Dunlavey: Such questions aren't really aimed for "grumpy old socks" like yourself... :D –  Matthieu N. Dec 26 '10 at 9:24

7 Answers 7

This implementation should be fast:

inline std::string first_last_n(std::string::size_type n, const std::string& s)
{
    n = std::min(n, s.size());
    std::string ret;
    ret.reserve(2*n);
    ret.append(s.begin(), s.begin() + n);
    ret.append(s.end() - n, s.end());
    return ret;
}

It passes all three unit tests.

When using GNU libstdc++, the line that declares & initializes ret is extremely fast because libstdc++ uses a global "empty string" variable. Thus, it's simply a pointer copy. Calls to begin and end on s are also fast because they will resolve to the const versions of begin and end, begin() const and end() const, so the internal representation of s is not "leaked". With libstdc++, std::string::const_iterator is const char*, which is a pointer type and random access iterator. Thus, when std::string::append<const char*>(const char*, const char*) calls std::distance to obtain the length of the input range, it is a pointer difference operation. Also, std::string::append<const char*>(const char*, const char*) results in something like a memmove. Finally, the reserve operation ensures that enough memory is available for the return value.

EDIT: For the curious, here is the initialization of ret in the assembly output of MinGW g++ 4.5.0:

    movl    $__ZNSs4_Rep20_S_empty_rep_storageE+12, (%ebx)

It's simply copying the pointer to the global "empty representation".

EDIT2: Okay. I have now tested four variants with g++ 4.5.0 and Visual C++ 16.00.30319.01:

Variant 1 (the "c_str variant"):

inline std::string first_last_n(std::string::size_type n, const std::string& s)
{
   std::string::size_type s_size = s.size();
   n = std::min(n, s_size);
   std::string ret;
   ret.reserve(2*n);
   const char *s_cStr = s.c_str(), *s_cStr_end = s_cStr + s_size;
   ret.append(s_cStr, s_cStr + n);
   ret.append(s_cStr_end - n, s_cStr_end);
   return ret;
}

Variant 2 (the "data string" variant):

inline std::string first_last_n(std::string::size_type n, const std::string& s)
{
   std::string::size_type s_size = s.size();
   n = std::min(n, s_size);
   std::string ret;
   ret.reserve(2*n);
   const char *s_data = s.data(), *s_data_end = s_data + s_size;
   ret.append(s_data, s_data + n);
   ret.append(s_data_end - n, s_data_end);
   return ret;
}

Variant 3:

inline std::string first_last_n(std::string::size_type n, const std::string& s)
{
   std::string::size_type s_size = s.size();
   n = std::min(n, s_size);
   std::string ret(s);
   std::string::size_type d = s_size - n;
   return ret.replace(n, d, s, d, n);
}

Variant 4 (my original code):

inline std::string first_last_n(std::string::size_type n, const std::string& s)
{
   n = std::min(n, s.size());
   std::string ret;
   ret.reserve(2*n);
   ret.append(s.begin(), s.begin() + n);
   ret.append(s.end() - n, s.end());
   return ret;
}

The results for g++ 4.5.0 are:

  • Variant 4 is the fastest
  • Variant 3 is second (5% slower than variant 4)
  • Variant 1 is third (2% slower than variant 3)
  • Variant 2 is fourth (0.2% slower than variant 1)

The results for VC++ 16.00.30319.01 are:

  • Variant 1 is the fastest
  • Variant 2 is second (3% slower than variant 1)
  • Variant 4 is third (4% slower than variant 2)
  • Variant 3 is fourth (17% slower than variant 4)

Unsurprisingly, the variant that is fastest depends on the compiler. However, not knowing which compiler will be used I think that my variant is best because it is a familiar style of C++, it is the fastest when using g++, and it is not that much slower than variants 1 or 2 when using VC++.

One thing interesting from the VC++ results is that using c_str rather than data is faster. Perhaps that is why your interviewer said that there is a faster way than your implementation.

EDIT3:

Actually, I just thought about another variant:

Variant 5:

inline std::string first_last_n(std::string::size_type n, const std::string& s)
{
   n = std::min(n, s.size());
   std::string ret;
   ret.reserve(2*n);
   std::string::const_iterator s_begin = s.begin(), s_end = s.end();
   ret.append(s_begin, s_begin + n);
   ret.append(s_end - n, s_end);
   return ret;
}

It's just like variant 4 except that the begin and end iterators for s are saved.

When variant 5 is tested, it actually beats out variant 2 (the data string variant) when using VC++:

  • Variant 1 is the fastest
  • Variant 5 is second (1.6% slower than variant 1)
  • Variant 2 is third (1.4% slower than variant 5)
  • Variant 4 is third (4% slower than variant 2)
  • Variant 3 is fourth (17% slower than variant 4)
share|improve this answer
2  
Also note that NRVO may be done by the compiler, thus removing the cost of copying the value back. –  Loki Astari Dec 21 '10 at 0:24
4  
Your comment about std::string::const_iterator may be true for gnu stl, but its certainly not the case for msvc stl. I believe a solution should take into account a few of the more widely used STLs and their implementation idiosyncrasies, not just one. –  Matthieu N. Dec 21 '10 at 0:27
    
It doesn't seem to be just a pointer even with gnu (perhaps such an implementation is possible, but it would be considered very bad taste because of the hidden errors this can create). However, after optimizations I'd expect the binary to be an exact equivalent. - If you consider msvc's stl and performance, then either you don't use it at all, or you disable all the debugging code it contains? –  visitor Dec 21 '10 at 12:33
    
@visitor: I don't understand what you wrote. Is there another way to phrase what you mean? –  Daniel Trebbien Dec 21 '10 at 21:00
    
@Daniel + @Zenikoder: Even if it's not a const char *, it must be a random access iterator, which implies that the std::distance call used in append will always be efficient. (In MSVC it usually results in a check to ensure the two iterators are from the same container, but that's about it) –  Billy ONeal Jan 3 '11 at 3:11

If you don't need to maintain the contents of the original string, then you can copy the last n characters into positions [n+1, 2n] of the original string and truncate it at 2n. You will have to be careful to first expand the string and also be careful not to overwrite any characters before writing to them if the string is shorter than 2n.

This will halve the number of operations to construct the string, as well as remove the need to create a new string. So its theoretically between 2 and 4 times faster. But of course you have just destroyed the original string, which you'd have to ask the interviewer if it is acceptable.

share|improve this answer
    
The original input string is used subsequently, so mutating/chaning it is now allowed. –  Matthieu N. Dec 20 '10 at 23:16
2  
@Zenikoder: The string is (well was) passed by value, so there's no problem manipulating the copy in place in the function body and returning it. –  Charles Bailey Dec 20 '10 at 23:25
5  
@Charles It was passed as a const reference, which cannot be modified by the function. –  marcog Dec 20 '10 at 23:30
1  
Not in the original code; only in Zenikoder's modifications. –  Charles Bailey Dec 20 '10 at 23:33
4  
@Charles Passing by value and then doing what I suggested here is less efficient than passing by reference and then doing what @Zenikoder did. –  marcog Dec 20 '10 at 23:40

How about removing the middle N-2n characters, where N is the length of the source string?

share|improve this answer
1  
Proposing an idea is great, but how this particular one you have going to incur less copies/shuffles and instantiations than the examples already provided by others and myself? - in short a code example will be better able to provide us with your insights. –  Matthieu N. Dec 21 '10 at 0:55
// compiled with cl /Ox first_last_n.cpp /W4 /EHsc

inline void
first_last_n2(string::size_type n, const std::string &s, string &out)  // method 2
{
  // check against degenerate input
  assert(n > 0);
  assert(n <= s.size());

  out.reserve(2*n);
  out.assign(s, 0, n);
  out.append(s, s.size()-n, n);
}

Times:

method 1:  // original method
2.281
method 2:  // my method
0.687
method 3:  // your code.
0.782

Note: Timing specifically tests "long" strings. I.e. those where short string optimization is not used. (My strings were 100 length).

share|improve this answer
1  
Are asserts generated in release mode? If they're not then your timings are off. –  Matthieu N. Dec 21 '10 at 1:02
    
@Zenikoder: They are generated as long as NDEBUG is not defined. I tested both with and without -- made almost no difference. –  Alex Budovski Dec 21 '10 at 1:23

My only thought is that if this function is only called with C null-terminated strings, you might be requiring the extra construction of a std::string for parameter 's'.

Possibly the 'more' efficient method would be to allow either a std::string or const char *s passed in.

share|improve this answer
    
You really can't make an assumption like that when working with the std::string type. –  Matthieu N. Dec 20 '10 at 23:35
    
@Zenikoder can't assume that a copy isn't made? I don't know if the standard requires it but I haven't seen an implementation of std::string::string( const char * ) constructor which doesn't copy the string. –  MerickOWA Dec 20 '10 at 23:39

Memcpy is a cheat?

#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

std::string first_last_n(int n, const std::string& s)
{
  if (s.size() < n)
      return "";

    char str[n*2];
    memcpy(str, s.data(), n);
    memcpy(str+n, s.data() + s.size()-n, n);

    return (const char *)str;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << first_last_n(2, "123454321") << std::endl;
}

EDIT So I removed the other one. This is not a cheat.

share|improve this answer
    
initially using anything from the standard libraries isn't a cheat, so memcpy is fine, however why go to all the trouble of fiddling with memory on the stack only to have to copy all back into a string instance, why not do all the fiddling with the actual result string? –  Matthieu N. Dec 20 '10 at 23:56
    
Return value optimization will happen here, so there is no need for a refernce for a result object. –  Industrial-antidepressant Dec 21 '10 at 0:07
    
Can you guarantee RVO will take place? its not a mandated behavior in the C++ standard, and most optimizers are very selective in how/when they do it. –  Matthieu N. Dec 21 '10 at 0:13
2  
This code relies on non-standard variable-length arrays, though. –  UncleBens Dec 21 '10 at 0:31
1  
Isn't there a slight bug with this only copying 9 out of the 10 last characters? Your array needs to be 2*n+1. 2*n for the characters and one for the null terminator. –  MerickOWA Dec 21 '10 at 2:17

If you must pass the tests then you're going to have to write inefficient code, because you must return a copy of a string. This implies you must use dynamic allocation, possibly multiple times because of the copy.

So change the tests and change the signature.

template<class Out>
Out first_last_n(const std::string::size_type& n, const std::string& s, Out r)
{
    r = copy_n(s.begin(), n, r);
    std::string::const_iterator pos(s.end());
    std::advance(pos, -n);
    return copy_n(pos, n, r);
}

Then call it like so:

std::string s("Hello world!");
char r[5];
r[4] = 0;
first_last_n(2, s, r);

This allows you to use dynamic programming, and it eliminates the need of dynamic allocation in the function.

I like my algorithms minimalistic, and I purposely eliminated the check for n being smaller or equal to the size of the string. I replace the check with a pre-condition for the function. Preconditions are faster than checks: they have zero overhead.

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3  
As has been noted, its the value in r at the end of the day that is important. feel free to modify the tests as long as the actual values remain the same. –  Matthieu N. Dec 21 '10 at 0:52

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