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Is there a way to get logrotate to only compress files modified X number of days ago (e.g. mtime +2)

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well you can use delaycompress to wait one more cycle. Basically if you rotate daily then it will keep yesterdays logs uncompressed.

Besides that you could try not using logrotate to compress the files and write a bash script to run like once a day and compress all files older than a certain date.

Here is a tutorial to bash that I personally like: http://www.linuxconfig.org/Bash_scripting_Tutorial

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One option could be to use logrotate to rotate to a different extension, then use logrotate to rotate into compressed files:

/var/log/raw.log {
  daily
  nocompress
  extension .old
  }

/var/log/*.old {
  daily
  compress
  delaycompress
  rotate 10
  }

This Rube Goldberg contraption will result in the following:

raw.log
raw.log.old
raw.log.old.1
raw.log.old.2.gz
raw.log.old.3.gz

Thus you have two archived days of logs which are uncompressed.

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Could you do something like the following?

/var/log/access.log {
    daily
    nocompress
}

/var/log/access.7.log {
     daily
     compress
}

I think that will give you something like

access.log
access.1.log
access.2.log
access.3.log    
access.4.log
access.5.log
access.6.log
access.7.log.gz
access.8.log.gz
access.log
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Did you test it yourself? If so, this answer would be good. – nalply Oct 21 '12 at 10:10
    
Any verdict? this looks awesome – Kevin Jan 11 '14 at 7:04
    
This is not working because the uncompress logs are not removed. A compressed version is just added. – Nicolas BADIA Aug 9 '14 at 6:59

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