Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a nutshell

I have a program that is gradually using more and more memory over time. I am using jmap and jhat to try and diagnose it but am still not quite there.

Background

The program is a long-running server backed by an hbase datastore providing a thrift service to a bunch of other stuff. However, after running for a few days, it will eventually hit the allocated heap limit, and thrash back and forth with nearly all time spent in garbage collection. It would seem references are getting kept to a lot of data somewhere

What I've done so far

After fiddling about with jstat and jconsole some I ended up taking heapdumps with jmap of the running process, and run it through jhat, and the numbers simple don't add up to anywhere near the memory utilisation

jmap -F -dump:live,format=b,file=heap.dump 12765

jmap -F -dump:format=b,file=heap.all 12765

Some stuff off the top of the histogram

Class   Instance Count  Total Size
class [B     7493    228042570
class java.util.HashMap$Entry    2833152     79328256
class [Ljava.util.HashMap$Entry;     541     33647856
class [Ljava.lang.Object;    303698  29106440
class java.lang.Long     2851889     22815112
class org.apache.hadoop.hbase.KeyValue   303593  13358092
class org.apache.hadoop.hbase.client.Result  303592  9714944
class [I     14074   9146580
class java.util.LinkedList$Entry     303841  7292184
class [Lorg.apache.hadoop.hbase.KeyValue;    303592  7286208
class org.apache.hadoop.hbase.io.ImmutableBytesWritable  305097  4881552
class java.util.ArrayList    302633  4842128
class [Lorg.apache.hadoop.hbase.client.Result;   297     2433488
class [C     5391    320190

While the totals here don't add up to it, at the point that heap dump was taken the process was using over 1gb of memory.

The immediate apparent culprit seems like I'm leaving HBase Result and KeyValue entries all over the place. Trying to trace up the references, I eventually hit

Object at 0x2aab091e46d0

instance of org.apache.hadoop.hbase.ipc.HBaseClient$Call@0x2aab091e46d0 (53 bytes)

Class:

class org.apache.hadoop.hbase.ipc.HBaseClient$Call
Instance data members:

done (Z) : true
error (L) : <null>
id (I) : 57316
param (L) : org.apache.hadoop.hbase.ipc.HBaseRPC$Invocation@0x2aab091e4678 (48 bytes) 
this$0 (L) : org.apache.hadoop.hbase.ipc.HBaseClient@0x2aaabfb78f30 (86 bytes) 
value (L) : org.apache.hadoop.hbase.io.HbaseObjectWritable@0x2aab092e31c0 (40 bytes) 
References to this object:

Other Queries

Reference Chains from Rootset
Exclude weak refs
Include weak refs
Objects reachable from here

Help needed:

There seems to be no references to this final HBaseCLient$Call object(or any of the others like it, each which hold a thousand or so keyvalues with all their internal data). Shouldn't it be getting GCed? Am I just misunderstanding how the gc works or the extent to which jhat will verify references? If so what further can I do to track down my "missing" memory? What other steps can I take to track this down?

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried JProfiler? It's pretty good. Much nicer to use than jhat. Full disclosure: I own no shares in whoever makes JProfiler :) –  Cameron Skinner Dec 21 '10 at 2:42
    
I haven't tried JProfiler though I'm also using the eclipse memory analysis perspective. I will try to give it a poke, but I have come to the point I am pretty sure that data isn't actually leaking, just the gc settings may be too loose by default as my survivor spaces are getting to be 100mb committed each but rarely have much usage(it goes up in spikes during big calculations) –  juhanic Dec 22 '10 at 5:18

3 Answers 3

You can try JProfiler 10 days for free. With JProfiler you will solve this issue in a few minutes.

share|improve this answer

Check this Java Memory Monitoring article Link

This May help you to over come your issue http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/J2SE/monitoring/

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I came across that article when I was trying to figure this by myself. It was very informative –  juhanic Dec 21 '10 at 3:10

I recommend first trying JVisualVM, which distributes with the latest JDK.

Also, if you can justify the cost, I have found JProfiler to be an excellent tool, over the years.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.