Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to do this:

class Graphic
{
    int *array;
    Graphic( int size )
    {
        int temp_array[size];
        array = temp_array;
        glGenTextures( size, array );
    }
}

Will this work? And even if it will, is there a better way to do this?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Using new means you have to remember to delete [] it; using compiler-dependent variable-size arrays means you lose portability.

It's much better to use a vector.

#include <vector>

class Graphic
{
    std::vector<int> array;
    Graphic( int size )
    {
        array.resize(size);
        glGenTextures( size, &array[0] );
    }
}

The language guarantees that vector elements will be contiguous in memory so it's safe to do &array[0] here.

share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't sure how to use a vector with the glGenTextures function, but this makes sense. thanks! –  user542687 Dec 21 '10 at 3:41
    
@Jay: You're welcome. You can upvote answers you like (hint hint ;) ). –  j_random_hacker Dec 21 '10 at 3:44
    
@j_random_hacker I don't have upvote privileges yet, but I will accept the answer in a moment. –  user542687 Dec 21 '10 at 3:50
    
and now that I accepted your answer, I get upvote privileges. lol –  user542687 Dec 21 '10 at 3:51
    
@Jay: Works for me! :) Actually that's interesting that new users can't upvote right away... WTH can they do then? :) –  j_random_hacker Dec 21 '10 at 3:53

No, the memory for temp_array is allocated on the stack. When the function ends then that memory is deallocated and all you'll be left with is a dangling pointer. If you want to keep the array valid beyond the point that the constructor returns then allocate it dynamically using new. Example:

array = new int[size]

And then remember to delete it. Typically this is done in the destructor like this:

delete[] array
share|improve this answer
3  
And then of course you're in trouble with copy and assignment. Much better to use a std:vector. –  sje397 Dec 21 '10 at 3:33
1  
Better: use std::vector and the destructor is automatically generated for you (along with early exit due to exception, etc). Also, the original code won't even compile, the C++ standard requires that size in int temp_array[size]; must be a compile-time constant. –  Ben Voigt Dec 21 '10 at 3:34
    
@Jay: You can still use vector. The language guarantees that its elements will be contiguous in memory (for this exact reason), so you can take the address of the 1st element and pass it to glGenTextures(). –  j_random_hacker Dec 21 '10 at 3:40
1  
@sje397: No, you're not in trouble because you can always implement those functions properly or deny that they are used. Whether std::vector is better or not is context dependent. Maybe the OP is ok with it deep copying the vector, or maybe he/she would rather it shared the pointer with another object. These are context dependent issues that become relevant when the class is used, but not in the answer to the question as it's posed. –  sashang Dec 21 '10 at 4:20
1  
@sashang: If you're going to remind the reader to delete the allocated memory, then why not remind them to handle it properly when copying or assigning? The latter is more complex and more likely to be an issue. –  sje397 Dec 21 '10 at 4:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.