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Let's say I have three classes. One being the parent and two being "childs". However, I'm not using class - extends -:

class root
{
   function root(){
      $this->son = new son();
      $this->daughter = new daughter();
   }
}
class son
{
 ...
}
class daughter
{
  ...
}

How could I call a function of son from a function of daughter? In other words, how could I reference the class root from son/daughter so that I could call functions of each other, from each other?

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Have root pass $this to the constructor of each child, and then have the children store it in a variable and reference it later? –  Amber Dec 21 '10 at 3:50
    
You shouldn't be calling son from daughter. If you are you should refactor the code to do it in root. –  Byron Whitlock Dec 21 '10 at 3:52
1  
@Byron Whitlock: why not? Haven't you ever asked you parent to ask your sister about something? ;-) –  zerkms Dec 21 '10 at 3:55
    
@zerkms: lol good point! @Amber: Yes, I'll give it a try! –  JCOC611 Dec 21 '10 at 4:34
    
even though it is a sample from real life, I agree with @Byron that it is a bad practice in programming. You should not chain objects in such way. –  zerkms Dec 21 '10 at 4:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A classic case of dependency injection.

class root {

   function root() {
      $this->son = new son($this);
      $this->daughter = new daughter($this);
   }

}

class son {

   function __construct($parent) {
       $this->parent = $parent;
   }

   function foo() {
       $this->parent->daughter->bar();
   }

}

Just be careful not to create rigid dependencies between classes that shouldn't have them. Inheritance may be the better way to go. Alternatives include the registry pattern and factory patterns.

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Clean and simple answer, thanks. I think I did try this, but I didn't use __constructor but the name of the class, well it now works! –  JCOC611 Dec 21 '10 at 4:46

The only possible way here is to explicitly pass the reference to your root class object:

function root(){
   $this->son = new son($this);
   $this->daughter = new daughter($this);
}

And accept it in the son and daughter constructors.

class son
{
    private $root;

    public function son($root)
    {
        $this->root = $root;
    }
}

class daughter
{
    private $root;

    public function daughter($root)
    {
        $this->root = $root;
    }

    public function doSomethingToBrother()
    {
        $this->root->son->some_method();
    }
}
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You got it! SO should have a system - for a question like there were there are'nt many different answer - where we can tell if other ppl are answering so we don't need to answer our self. –  The Scrum Meister Dec 21 '10 at 4:08

Since son and daughter aren't actually subclasses of root, the only way to call each other's functions is to get an instance and call from there. Unless the functions are declared static, in which case you can call them via son::my_func() / daughter::my_func, etc.

I'm not sure what the goal is, but maybe this will help: http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.patterns.php

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Bad decision. In this case you will not be able to have several roots and children. –  zerkms Dec 21 '10 at 3:53
    
Then by bad decision you mean the functions aren't declared static, I was just saying if they were they'd be callable and that's how. –  pssdbt Dec 21 '10 at 4:18

You will have to pass an instance of root to son or daughter if you want to call methods between them. Or if it is something that does not depend on the instance, use static methods.

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Example, hopefully speaking for itself, with the important lines being:

a) $this->son = new Son($this); – where a reference to the Root object is passed to a new Son class (or Daughter respectively).

b) echo $son->root->daughter->aboutme(); – where the reference is used to access other objects, root might have access to.

One can consider this a kind of Mediator pattern.

<?php 
    class Root
    {
        function __construct(){
            $this->son = new Son($this);
            $this->daughter = new Daughter($this);
        }
        function aboutme() { print "I'm root.\n"; }

    }
    class Son
    {
        function __construct($root) {
            $this->root = $root;
        }
        function aboutme() { print "I'm a son.\n"; }
    }
    class Daughter
    {
        function __construct($root) {
            $this->root = $root;
        }
        function aboutme() { print "I'm a daughter.\n"; }
    }

    $root = new Root();
    echo $root->aboutme();
    $son = $root->son;
    echo $son->aboutme();
    echo $son->root->daughter->aboutme(); 
?>

This will yield:

I'm root.
I'm a son.
I'm a daughter.
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