Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need this table http://code.google.com/apis/chart/docs/gallery/qr_codes.html#details in my program and I'm not even sure if an associative array is the way to go

given the type (numeric/alphanumeric), number of characters and EC (eror correction) level, I want a function to return the version (first column)

thanks

share|improve this question
    
What is your question? –  Matt Ball Dec 21 '10 at 4:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

First, JavaScript has "Arrays" and "Objects". By 'associative array' I assume you mean a JavaScript Object, using keys other than non-negative integers.

You can create JavaScript object literals using syntax such as the following:

var versions = {
  "1" : {
    rowcols : [21,21],
    charsByECLevel : {
      L : {
        digits:41,
        alpha:25
      },
      M : {
        digits:34,
        alpha:20
      }
    }
  },
  "2" : {
    rowcols : [25,25],
    charsByECLevel : {
      L : {
        digits:77,
        alpha:47
      },
      M : {
        digits:63,
        alpha:48
      }
    }
  }
};

You would then access the properties like so:

console.log( versions[1].charsByECLevel.L.digits );
// 41

To loop through the values, you could do this:

function findVersion( versions, level, digits ){
  for (var versionNumber in versions){
    if (versions.hasOwnProperty(versionNumber)){
      if (versions[versionNumber].charsByECLevel[level].digits == digits){
        return versionNumber;
      }
    }
  }
}

findVersion( versions, "L", 77 );
// returns "2"

Edit: Having written the above, if you only want to look up versions based on level and digits, you should probably reverse the hash. Instead of looping through and checking the versions, index them directly and look it up in constant time:

var versionByLevelAndDigits = {
  L : {
     41 : 1,
     77 : 2,
    127 : 3
  },
  M : {
     34 : 1,
     63 : 2,
    101 : 3
  }
};

var version = versionByLevelAndDigits["L"][77];
// 2
share|improve this answer
    
awesome, thanks –  Mr Rab Lorcs Dec 21 '10 at 4:43
    
@MrRabLorcs My pleasure. Please be sure to see the updated answer I put at the bottom. –  Phrogz Dec 21 '10 at 4:53

If you have the information stored in an array of objects, like this:

var variants = [
    {
        version : 1,
        ec : 'L',
        rows : 21,
        // more data
    },
    {
        version : 1,
        ec : 'M',
        rows : 21,
        // more data
    },
    {
        version : 2,
        // more data
    },
    // more variants
]

You can easily find the version number by traversing the outer array.

function findVersion(ec, rows, ...) {
    for (var i = 0, l = variants.length; i < l; ++i) {
        var v = variants[i];
        if (v.ec == ec &&
            v.rows == rows &&
            // more fields to compare
        ) return v.version;
    }
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
edited: nevermind, Phrogz explains it pretty well –  Mr Rab Lorcs Dec 21 '10 at 4:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.