Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a web programmer with a home web dev operation. I have multiple web servers in my house on a FIOS connection. I have my own domain pointed to my router through dyndns.org's custom domain service.

My ISP gives me ONE static IP address, which at the moment allows me to configure my router to direct outbound web traffic from one server through port 80 and another server through port 8080. This sucks because many companies block port 8080 these days causing some of my corporate clients to not be able to hit my second web server.

Is there any way for me to direct regular old port 80 web traffic to TWO SEPARATE web servers internally on my network using two separate host names?

For instance. I want http://webserver1.mydomain.com to hit one web server on my network, and http://webserver2.mydomain.com to hit another web server and have both sets of traffic served on port 80.

Is this even possible? If not, can I do a hack by programmatically routing traffic from one web server transparently to another?

For the record I run MS Windows Server 2008 IIS 7.0 stack, a D-link DIR-655 router, and use DynDNS for my domain needs.

share|improve this question
    
FYI, you can also get more IP addresses from Verizon; I have 8. I don't believe there was even an additional charge. –  derobert Jan 16 '09 at 6:36
    
If you have a static IP, why would you use DynDNS? Either your IP is static or it's dynamic... –  Gareth Jan 16 '09 at 7:00
    
Convenience of having a domain name point to the IP. So you don't have to remember 12.42.136.43, but ilikepancakes.dyndns.com –  FryGuy Jan 16 '09 at 19:43
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The name of the solution you looking for is called reverse proxy'ing.
There are implementations in apache, squid and Mircosoft ISA Server.

If your adventurous you can always roll your own? or modify something like this to meet your your needs.

I've had customers using squid reverse proxy that's high volume and it works perfectly!

It does tend to screw up your web logs on the webserver though, traffic will all appear to come from your internal proxy host that's doing the redirection/rewriting.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for ISA Server. I know Matias IRL and he'd be all about it. –  Chris May 6 '10 at 15:59
    
I actually went with IIS7's ARR+Rewrite module. I wanted to use ISA Server, but it was just SO OLD and discontinued. The new system center stuff looks like overkill so the IIS7 modules are a good fit and work fine (although SSL proxying does require some heavy tweaking). –  Matias Nino Jan 17 '13 at 13:38
add comment

Yes, use IIS7's Rewrite module to do this

share|improve this answer
add comment

Some sort of application layer routing could be your option. This article points to how to do it on ISA server (using web rules)

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000984.html

share|improve this answer
add comment

You might be able to set up apache with 2 vhosts, and then in each of their blocks put a proxy of the appropriate site on your local network:

In vhost 1:

ProxyRequests Off

<Proxy *>
Order deny,allow
Allow from all
</Proxy>

ProxyPass / http://192.168.0.49/
ProxyPassReverse / http://192.168.0.49/

In vhost 2:

ProxyRequests Off

<Proxy *>
Order deny,allow
Allow from all
</Proxy>

ProxyPass / http://192.168.0.50/
ProxyPassReverse / http://192.168.0.50/

You'd need mod_proxy, and I'm not even sure this would work

share|improve this answer
add comment

Why not keep it simple and just order or request a second IP address on your account? This seems to be a much easier solution than a convoluted hardware and/or software setup. Just don't tell them you're hosting websites because ISPs generally don't like people to do that on residential accounts (I'm actually surprised they don't block port 80).

share|improve this answer
    
The do block port 80 on res accounts. This is a business acct. –  Matias Nino Apr 28 '10 at 19:45
add comment

This is an old post but I have the same problem. Verizon only gives you 1 ip. If you want more you have to use their business plan for about $100 a month. I have a redhat and windows 2008r2 home server running. I have 2 godaddy domain names both pointing to my verizon wan ip address. My windows server is using port 80 for mysite1.com and my linux port 8080 for mysite2.com. I dont use DYN because I want to use my own domain names. I made an IIS site hostheader to direct mysite2.com to my linux box. Both domains work online but typing in mysite2.com directs to mysite2.com:8080 in the browser url window. I dont think there is a way to hide 8080. At least not correctly. I work at a government agency and they block sites that use port 8080. They also block domains that are forwarded with masking/frame. So masking 8080 will cause your site to be blocked. The best solution is for Verizon to offer 2 ip address for a reasonable price to people like us!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.