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(Note - this is a re-post as my first question got posted under wrong headline: Here Sorry!)

I have a standard WPF treeview and have bound items to view model classes.

I now wish to handle behaviour when items are double-clicked (opening documents visual-studio-style).

I can get event-handler to fire in the control housing the treeview (xaml shown), but how do I bind to specific behaviour on the view model classes - e.g. ProjectViewModel?

Preferable bound to ICommand-implementer, as this is used elsewhere...

Thanks for any comments,

Anders, Denmark

<TreeView ItemsSource="{Binding Projects}" MouseDoubleClick="TreeView_MouseDoubleClick">
    <TreeView.ItemContainerStyle>
        <!-- 
This Style binds a TreeViewItem to a TreeViewItemViewModel. 
-->
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type TreeViewItem}">
            <Setter Property="IsExpanded" Value="{Binding IsExpanded, Mode=TwoWay}" />
            <Setter Property="IsSelected" Value="{Binding IsSelected, Mode=TwoWay}" />
            <Setter Property="FontWeight" Value="Normal" />
            <Style.Triggers>
                <Trigger Property="IsSelected" Value="True">
                    <Setter Property="FontWeight" Value="Bold" />
                </Trigger>
            </Style.Triggers>
        </Style>
    </TreeView.ItemContainerStyle>

    <TreeView.Resources>
        <HierarchicalDataTemplate DataType="{x:Type Implementations:ProjectViewModel}" ItemsSource="{Binding Children}">
            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                <Image Width="16" Height="16" Margin="3,0" Source="Images\Region.png" />
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding DisplayName}" />
            </StackPanel>
        </HierarchicalDataTemplate>

        <HierarchicalDataTemplate DataType="{x:Type Implementations:PumpViewModel}" ItemsSource="{Binding Children}">
            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                <Image Width="16" Height="16" Margin="3,0" Source="Images\State.png" />
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding Name}" />
            </StackPanel>
        </HierarchicalDataTemplate>

        <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type Implementations:PumpDesignViewModel}">
            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                <Image Width="16" Height="16" Margin="3,0" Source="Images\City.png" />
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding Name}" />
            </StackPanel>
        </DataTemplate>
    </TreeView.Resources>
</TreeView>
share|improve this question
    
I have viewmodel-objects handling the individual treeitems with regards to display, lazy load etc. However, when I want to 'activate'/double-click an item in the treeview, I'd like this action to be handled by the same viewmodel objects that handle the display - but how do I do that? –  Anders Juul Dec 21 '10 at 9:33
    
Have you tried looking at Attached Behaviors? –  Fredrik Hedblad Dec 21 '10 at 9:36
    
Similar question using ListView, but answers are control-agnostic stackoverflow.com/questions/1035023/… –  surfen Dec 3 '11 at 17:15
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6 Answers 6

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Updating my answer a bit.

I've tried alot of different approaches for this and I still feel like Attached Behaviors is the best solution. Although it might look like alot of overhead in the begining it really isn't. I keep all of my behaviors for ICommands in the same place and whenever I need support for another event it is just a matter of copy/paste and change the event in the PropertyChangedCallback.

I also added the optional support for CommandParameter.

In the designer it is just a matter of selecting the desired event

enter image description here

You can set this either on TreeView, TreeViewItem or any other place that you like.

Example. Set it on the TreeView

<TreeView commandBehaviors:MouseDoubleClick.Command="{Binding YourCommand}"
          commandBehaviors:MouseDoubleClick.CommandParameter="{Binding}"
          .../>

Example. Set it on TreeViewItem

<TreeView ItemsSource="{Binding Projects}">
    <TreeView.ItemContainerStyle>
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type TreeViewItem}">
            <Setter Property="commandBehaviors:MouseDoubleClick.Command"
                    Value="{Binding YourCommand}"/>
            <Setter Property="commandBehaviors:MouseDoubleClick.CommandParameter"
                    Value="{Binding}"/>
        </Style>
    </TreeView.ItemContainerStyle>
</TreeView>

And here is the Attached Behavior MouseDoubleClick

public class MouseDoubleClick
{
    public static DependencyProperty CommandProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("Command",
        typeof(ICommand),
        typeof(MouseDoubleClick),
        new UIPropertyMetadata(CommandChanged));

    public static DependencyProperty CommandParameterProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("CommandParameter",
                                            typeof(object),
                                            typeof(MouseDoubleClick),
                                            new UIPropertyMetadata(null));

    public static void SetCommand(DependencyObject target, ICommand value)
    {
        target.SetValue(CommandProperty, value);
    }

    public static void SetCommandParameter(DependencyObject target, object value)
    {
        target.SetValue(CommandParameterProperty, value);
    }
    public static object GetCommandParameter(DependencyObject target)
    {
        return target.GetValue(CommandParameterProperty);
    }

    private static void CommandChanged(DependencyObject target, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        Control control = target as Control;
        if (control != null)
        {
            if ((e.NewValue != null) && (e.OldValue == null))
            {
                control.MouseDoubleClick += OnMouseDoubleClick;
            }
            else if ((e.NewValue == null) && (e.OldValue != null))
            {
                control.MouseDoubleClick -= OnMouseDoubleClick;
            }
        }
    }

    private static void OnMouseDoubleClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        Control control = sender as Control;
        ICommand command = (ICommand)control.GetValue(CommandProperty);
        object commandParameter = control.GetValue(CommandParameterProperty);
        command.Execute(commandParameter);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! I will use that! Thanks for taking the time! –  Anders Juul Dec 21 '10 at 18:07
    
For some reason it doesn't work for me - I suspect the problem is in the xaml as I can see that no breakpoints gets activated if I throw them all over the new code. Any clues as to how I may debug this? –  Anders Juul Dec 21 '10 at 21:31
    
@Anders Juul: Do you get any binding errors in the output window? See this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/4051713/… for how to set Data Binding Output to All in case you don't have this turned on –  Fredrik Hedblad Dec 21 '10 at 21:56
    
@Anders Juul: Uploaded my sample application so you can compare to that. I noticed that the bubble event for a TreeViewItem MouseDoubleClick may get you some undesired effects since it "walks down the tree". But that's another problem –  Fredrik Hedblad Dec 21 '10 at 23:42
    
@Melak: My error was that I did not place the Command on the individual ViewModels representing the TreeViewItems. Once I placed it correctly, it works like a charm! The posting about optios was very helpful. Thank you again and Glædelig Jul Hinsidan! –  Anders Juul Dec 22 '10 at 11:22
show 1 more comment

I am late for this, but I just used a different solution. Once again, it might not be the best, but here is how I did that.

First of all, the previous answer from Meleak is cool, but I feel like it is very heavy to be forced to add AttachedBehaviors just for something as basic as a MouseDoubleClick. This would force me to use a new pattern in my app and would even more complicate everything.

My aim is to stay as simple as possible. Therefore I did something very basic (my example is for a DataGrid, but you can use that on a lot of different controls):

<DataGrid MouseDoubleClick="DataGrid_MouseDoubleClick">
   <!-- ... -->
</DataGrid>

In the code-behind:

private void DataGrid_MouseDoubleClick(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
{
    //Execute the command related to the doubleclick, in my case Edit
    (this.DataContext as VmHome).EditAppCommand.Execute(null);
}

Why do I feel like it doesn't break the MVVM-pattern? Because in my opinion, the only things you should put in the code-behind are bridges to your viewModel, things very specific to your UI. In this case it just says that if you double click, fire the related command. It's almost the same than a Command="{Binding EditAppCommand}", I just simulated this behavior.

Feel free to give me your opinion on this, I'd be glad to hear some critics to this way of thinking, but for now I believe it's the easiest way to implement it without breaking MVVM.

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1  
@Demascus: Thanks for an alternative solution. In my opinion, tt really depends on how often you would need to do that. Notice that an attachedBehaviour solution is generic - control indepentent so it promotes reusability and maintainability, because you would have all your Commands bound declaratively in XAML. With all WPF has to offer, writing codebehind to map events to commands feels like too much overhead to me. I wish that all events supported Command binding out of the box. –  surfen Nov 27 '11 at 1:06
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Both Meleak and ígor's recommendations are great, but when the double click event handler is bound to TreeViewItem then this event handler is called for all of the item's parent elements (not just the clicked element). If it is not desired, here is another addition:

private static void OnMouseDoubleClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    Control control = sender as Control;
    ICommand command = (ICommand)control.GetValue(CommandProperty);
    object commandParameter = control.GetValue(CommandParameterProperty);

    if (sender is TreeViewItem)
    {
        if (!((TreeViewItem)sender).IsSelected)
            return;
    }

    if (command.CanExecute(commandParameter))
    {
        command.Execute(commandParameter);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This was very useful for me indeed. The only slight problem is that it assumed that the sender is actually selected, which is always true for a double click, but not when you change the event type to something else (i.e. MouseHover or things like that). –  Yellow Nov 5 '13 at 11:49
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Meleak solution is great!, but i added check

    private static void OnMouseDoubleClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        Control control = sender as Control;
        ICommand command = (ICommand)control.GetValue(CommandProperty);
        object commandParameter = control.GetValue(CommandParameterProperty);
       //Check command can execute!!  
      if(command.CanExecute(commandParameter ))
         command.Execute(commandParameter);
    }
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The best approach I've reached is just binding the IsSelected property from the TreeViewItem to the ViewModel in a Towway mode and implement the logic in the property setter. Then you can define what to do if the value is true or false, because this property will change whenever the user click an item.

class MyVM
{
  private bool _isSelected;
  public bool IsSelected
  {
    get { return _isSelected; }
    set
    {
      if (_isSelected == null)
       return;

      _isSelected = vale;

      if (_isSelected)
      {
        // Your logic goes here.
      }
      else
      {
        // Your other logic goes here.
      }
   }
}

This avoids a lot of code.

Also, this technique allows you to implement the "onclick" behaviour only in the ViewModels that really need it.

share|improve this answer
1  
But you missed the question, as the OP wants to handle the "double click" event. Your code is great, but only works for the "click" event. –  Julien N Aug 16 '12 at 17:21
    
@JulienN Yes, you are right. –  JoanComasFdz Aug 17 '12 at 9:30
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Just for curiosity: what if I take Frederiks part, but implement it directly as behavior?

public class MouseDoubleClickBehavior : Behavior<Control>
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty CommandProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("Command", typeof (ICommand), typeof (MouseDoubleClickBehavior), new PropertyMetadata(default(ICommand)));

    public ICommand Command
    {
        get { return (ICommand) GetValue(CommandProperty); }
        set { SetValue(CommandProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty CommandParameterProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("CommandParameter", typeof (object), typeof (MouseDoubleClickBehavior), new PropertyMetadata(default(object)));

    public object CommandParameter
    {
        get { return GetValue(CommandParameterProperty); }
        set { SetValue(CommandParameterProperty, value); }
    }

    protected override void OnAttached()
    {
        base.OnAttached();
        AssociatedObject.MouseDoubleClick += OnMouseDoubleClick;
    }

    protected override void OnDetaching()
    {
        AssociatedObject.MouseDoubleClick -= OnMouseDoubleClick;
        base.OnDetaching();
    }

    void OnMouseDoubleClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (Command == null) return;
        Command.Execute(/*commandParameter*/null);
    }
}
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