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IndexOf, IndexOfAny and LastIndexOf, LastIndexOfAny dont seem to do these (or maybe they do). I'm looking for the equialent of std::string's find_first_not_of and find_last_not_of. I'm thinking about creating an extension class but I'm not sure if C# already provides this functionality.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted
string source = "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog";
string chars = "ogd hte";

int? firstNotOf = source.Select((x, i) => new { Val = x, Idx = (int?)i })
                        .Where(x => chars.IndexOf(x.Val) == -1)
                        .Select(x => x.Idx)
                        .FirstOrDefault();

int? lastNotOf = source.Select((x, i) => new { Val = x, Idx = (int?)i })
                       .Where(x => chars.IndexOf(x.Val) == -1)
                       .Select(x => x.Idx)
                       .LastOrDefault();

Or, if you prefer some non-LINQ extension methods. These should have slightly better performance, especially for FindLastNotOf:

int? firstNotOf = source.FindFirstNotOf(chars);
int? lastNotof = source.FindLastNotOf(chars);

// ...

public static int? FindFirstNotOf(this string source, string chars)
{
    if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (chars == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("chars");
    if (source.Length == 0) return null;
    if (chars.Length == 0) return 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < source.Length; i++)
    {
        if (chars.IndexOf(source[i]) == -1) return i;
    }
    return null;
}

public static int? FindLastNotOf(this string source, string chars)
{
    if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (chars == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("chars");
    if (source.Length == 0) return null;
    if (chars.Length == 0) return source.Length - 1;

    for (int i = source.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        if (chars.IndexOf(source[i]) == -1) return i;
    }
    return null;
}

(It's possible that you might get better performance -- in both the LINQ and non-LINQ versions -- if you convert chars to a HashSet<char>, or maybe even a plain char[] array. You'd need to benchmark to find out, though any difference is likely to be negligible unless chars gets pretty big.)

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1  
Nice work, but who in their right mind finds any of that acceptable over a library or API routine? Looks like a MS fail. –  GTAE86 Mar 28 '14 at 18:11

If the use of LINQ is acceptable, you can call the First() and Last() methods with the appropriate predicate.

For instance, if you want the first and last characters that aren't vowels:

string vowels = "aeiouy";
char first = yourString.First(ch => vowels.IndexOf(ch) < 0);
char last = yourString.Last(ch => vowels.IndexOf(ch) < 0);

EDIT: The above will return the characters, not their indexes. In order to do that, you can project the indexes using the Select() method, but things will get hairy since we need to return -1 if no character matches:

int firstIndex = (yourString.Select(
        (ch, i) => new { Character = ch, Index = i }
    ).First(obj => vowels.IndexOf(obj.Character) < 0)
    ?? new { Character = '\0', Index = -1 }).Index;

int lastIndex = (yourString.Select(
        (ch, i) => new { Character = ch, Index = i }
    ).Last(obj => vowels.IndexOf(obj.Character) < 0)
    ?? new { Character = '\0', Index = -1 }).Index;

Alternatively, here's a less complicated solution based on @abatishchev's answer:

string vowels = "aeiouy";
int firstIndex = yourString.IndexOf(yourString.First(
    ch => vowels.IndexOf(ch) < 0));
int lastIndex = yourString.LastIndexOf(yourString.Last(
    ch => vowels.IndexOf(ch) < 0));
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3  
not exactly: find_first_not_of returns the position, not the character. –  Vlad Dec 21 '10 at 10:58
    
@Vlad, you're right, answer updated accordingly. Thanks :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Dec 21 '10 at 11:06
3  
I think that LINQ overcomplicates things. And this solution is very ineffective. We are creating lot's of temporary objects of anonymous type along with iterators. Writing method that does simple for loop will be better. –  alpha-mouse Dec 21 '10 at 11:15
    
You probably want to use LastOrDefault and FrstOrDefaut extension methods to supress exception throwing. Or I am missing something? –  v00d00 Dec 21 '10 at 11:58
    
@Dmitry, since I'm using anonymous types, those methods would return null and the subsequent access to the Index property would fail. Since I wanted to return -1 in that context, I had to create an explicit instance of the anonymous type with Index set to -1. I agree that's getting out of hand, though :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Dec 21 '10 at 12:04

Here's a Regex solution.

string testString = "oueytestie";
var matchFirstNotOf = Regex.Match(testString, @"[^aeiouy]");
int firstNotOf = matchFirstNotOf.Success ? matchFirstNotOf.Index : -1;
var matchLastNotOf = Regex.Match(testString, @"[^aeiouy]", RegexOptions.RightToLeft);
int lastNotOf = matchLastNotOf.Success ? matchLastNotOf.Index : -1;
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