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Like I wrote elsewhere, I seem to be sure that a white paper by Rick Brewster about multithreading used in Paint.NET once existed. I am not able to find any reference to this white paper again however. Does it (still) exist? And if so, where?

EDIT: Found out in comments to an unrelated question that Paint.NET is still free, but code is no longer available? Is this related to the fact that I can't seem to find that white paper any more?

EDIT2: Went straight to the horses mouth on this and will return any answer that I get here. In the meantime any answer you guys might have is more than welcome!

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3 Answers

Is it possible, that you found this whitepaper following a link on Coding Horror to Rick Brewster's Blog? Seems he has cleaned up his blog and there are no entries before 2006 anymore.

The only "very little" explanation about threading in Paint.Net i could find anymore was on CodeProject.

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Could very well be, yes. I hope Rick replies in the Paint.NET forum... –  peSHIr Jan 16 '09 at 9:45
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check for mono-paint (paint.net port for linux). it's source is available on google code

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I just received a private message reply on the Paint.NET forum from Rick Brewster:

No such whitepaper has ever existed.

That would at least explain why there seems to be no trace of it on Google. I must be going crazy after all?

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I too recall reading something-or-other about Paint.NET's multithreading, but perhaps that's just due to how often Rick mentions the attention he pays to multithreaded design. There's at least one blog post about Paint.NET and multicore performance. –  Jimmy Jan 16 '09 at 18:38
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