Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I have this code:

try {
    someMethod();
} catch (XYZException e) {
    // do something without using e
}

Doing this will give me a warning about declaring but never using e, which I hate. However, I also don't want to use a catch clause without that variable, because then it will catch all exceptions, not just XYZExceptions. This seems like a fairly often occurring pattern. I know I can use #pragma warning disable 0168 to suppress the warning, but I don't really find that a very elegant solution. Is there a better way?

share|improve this question
    
"Hate" is such a strong word but, given the set jaw and angry eyebrows of your avatar, possibly apt :-) – paxdiablo Mar 1 at 1:18
up vote 73 down vote accepted

Define the catch clause without the exception variable as follows:

try {
    someMethod();
} catch (XYZException) {
    // do something without using e
}
share|improve this answer

Define the catch clause without the exception variable as follows:

try {
    someMethod();
} catch (XYZException) {
    // do not state e in catch clause
}
share|improve this answer
6  
Duplicate entry; wasted time reading this to see what was different. Maybe someone should tidy this up? (Realise it's not much time but seems a waste when they're the same answer :-p) – Christopher Lightfoot Oct 24 '12 at 13:39
6  
Not only did I waste time reading the duplicate entry. I also wasted time reading the comment above flagging this fact. Woe to the curious guy that reads everything. – Joe Feb 5 '14 at 5:28
5  
Please note that both duplicates are written at the same time. – Maxim Eliseev Apr 8 '14 at 9:14
3  
@ChristopherLightfoot this answer was actually given 41 seconds before the other one. – Rory McCrossan Nov 12 '14 at 11:01
    
And, on top of that, this one doesn't use any made up words like exceptionhandler. Also, it's much more definite, tellling you to do something rather than just stating that you can do something :-) – paxdiablo Mar 1 at 1:15

Another option is to use

     try 
     {
          someMethod();
     } 
 #pragma warning disable 0168
     catch (XYZException e)
 #pragma warning restore 0168
     {
         // do not state e in catch clause
     }

This is useful in visual studio 2015 because it doesn't have a way to see the exception by default when debugging with a breakpoint on the catch.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.