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I'm trying to track down a memory leak in a C++ application in Windows and I've got a memory dump of the application with a large number of leaked objects. I'm using Windbg to track them down by doing the following:

// Get heap stats
!heap -s

This shows the following:

  Heap     Flags   Reserv  Commit  Virt   Free  List   UCR  Virt  Lock  Fast 
                    (k)     (k)    (k)     (k) length      blocks cont. heap 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
00150000 00000002    1024    272    272     20     2     1    0      0   L  
00250000 00001002      64     24     24      9     1     1    0      0   L  
00260000 00008000      64     12     12     10     1     1    0      0      
003a0000 00001002      64     24     24      1     0     1    0      0   L  
003d0000 00001002  392256 292256 292256      3     1     1    0     49   L  
00bb0000 00001002      64     56     56      1     1     1    0      0   L  
00c30000 00001002      64     32     32      7     1     1    0      0   L  
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

So I can see that heap 003d0000 contains the leaking objects so I use:

// Get individual heap stats
!heap -stat -h 003d0000

Which shows:

heap @ 003d0000
  group-by: TOTSIZE max-display: 20
    size     #blocks     total     ( %) (percent of total busy bytes)
    98 105de3 - 9b7bec8  (61.59)
    50 f052f - 4b19eb0  (29.75)
    8 21829f - 10c14f8  (6.64)
    2a0 881 - 1652a0  (0.55)
    d0 a5e - 86c60  (0.21)
    48 19a1 - 73548  (0.18)
    c0 8f0 - 6b400  (0.17)
    490 155 - 613d0  (0.15)
    40 1300 - 4c000  (0.12)
    20 1ff1 - 3fe20  (0.10)
    7c 7e1 - 3d0fc  (0.09)
    28 120c - 2d1e0  (0.07)
    8708 5 - 2a328  (0.07)
    34 8f4 - 1d190  (0.05)
    e0 1dd - 1a160  (0.04)
    bb88 2 - 17710  (0.04)
    f0 12b - 11850  (0.03)
    30 45d - d170  (0.02)
    10 b73 - b730  (0.02)
    90 f4 - 8940  (0.01)

So I have a leak of an object 98 bytes in size, I can track down what that object is with:

!heap -flt s 98

This shows:

<snip>
19f56c38 0014 0014  [01]   19f56c40    00098 - (busy)
      MyApp!MyObject::`vftable'
<snip>

This is where my knowledge of Windbg runs out, I can see that the object on the heap is of class MyObject but how do I find out where this object was created?

Any help would be very much appreciated!

Thanks, J

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a nice, short tutorial. You need to enable some Global Flags to get the stack trace, though. Also, depending on your platform / configuration you may run into an unfortunate problem.

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Perfect! That's exactly what I was looking for. I actually skimmed over that article while I was looking but completely missed the gflags at the top. Thanks. –  JWood Dec 22 '10 at 13:12

You could also use it with XPerf (from Windows Performance Toolkit), with the following flags: -heap -stackwalk HeapCreate+HeapAlloc+HeapRealloc. That would give you a nice profiler-style analysis of where memory was allocated but not freed.

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