Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got an Access application with an update query with the following syntax:

UPDATE TABLE1, TABLE2 SET 
TABLE2.VALUE1 = TABLE1.VALUE1, 
TABLE2.VALUE2 = TABLE1.VALUE2, 
TABLE2.VALUE3 = TABLE1.VALUE3, 
TABLE2.VALUE4 = TABLE1.VALUE4

The query is working but I do not understand what's going on here. I'm trying to convert this query to SQL Server. Can somebody please explain what this query does? My guess is that it's a special Access syntax.

Thanks, Sven

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It uses the older implicit JOIN syntax, although SQL Server should understand that syntax too.

It's INNER JOINing table1 and table2, then moving the values from table1 to table2. Because of the lack of JOIN conditions, if table1 has more than 1 row it may have unpredictable results.

Essentially it is:

 UPDATE Table1 INNER JOIN Table2 <<ON Missing Conditions Here>>
   SET Table2.Value1 = Table1.Value1
       Table2.Value2 = Table1.Value2
       Table2.Value3 = Table1.Value3
       Table2.Value4 = Table1.Value4

You can convert this to SQL Server with something like this:

 UPDATE Table2
   SET Table2.Value1 = Table1.Value1
       Table2.Value2 = Table1.Value2
       Table2.Value3 = Table1.Value3
       Table2.Value4 = Table1.Value4
   FROM Table1 INNER JOIN Table2 <<ON Missing Conditions Here>>
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Larry, thank you for your fast reply - now I understand. Strange though since the condition is missing - I'll have to investigate. –  Sven Dec 21 '10 at 15:53
    
At a guess, it's initializing all rows in Table 2 based on user-specified values that are saved in Table 1. –  Larry Lustig Dec 21 '10 at 16:21

Every field from TABLE2 will override corresponded field from TABLE1 with records from TABLE1 one by one. Result will be TABLE2 with all replaced records by last row from TABLE1. If TABLE1 has no records - no changes happens. Sorry for my english. And... it is SQL.

share|improve this answer

Try to avoid the "UPDATE with join" syntax in SQL Server. It is completely non-standard SQL but more seriously it gives unpredictable results without any error or warning if the joining criteria is not correct. Use the MERGE statement instead or use the standard version of the UPDATE statement (with a subquery) if you can.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.