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I am trying convert the following Collatz Conjecture algorithm from:

 public class CollatzConjexture
    {
        public static int Calculate(int StartIndex, int MaxSequence)
        {
            int ChainLength = 0;
            int key = 0;
            bool ContinuteCalulating = true;
            int LongestChain = 0;
            Int64 Remainder = 0;

            for (int i = StartIndex; i <= MaxSequence; i++)
            {
                ChainLength = 1;
                Remainder = i;
                ContinuteCalulating = true;

                while (ContinuteCalulating)
                {
                    Remainder = CalculateCollatzConjecture(Remainder);
                    if (Remainder == 1)
                        ContinuteCalulating = false;

                    ChainLength += 1;
                }

                if (ChainLength > LongestChain)
                {
                    LongestChain = ChainLength;
                    key = i;
                }
            }

            return key;
        }

        private static Int64 CalculateCollatzConjecture(Int64 Number)
        {
            if (Number % 2 == 0)
                return Number / 2;
            else
                return (3 * Number) + 1;
        }
    } 

To instead use the .NET 4.0 Parallel.For :

int ChainLength = 0;
            int key = 0;
            bool ContinuteCalulating = true;
            int LongestChain = 0;
            Int64 Remainder = 0;

            int[] nums = Enumerable.Range(1, 1500000).ToArray();
            long total = 0;

            // Use type parameter to make subtotal a long, not an int
            Parallel.For<int>(1, nums.Length, () => 1, (j, loop, subtotal) =>
            {
                Remainder = j;

                while (ContinuteCalulating)
                {
                    Remainder = CalculateCollatzConjecture(Remainder);
                    if (Remainder == 1)
                        ContinuteCalulating = false;

                    ChainLength += 1;
                }

                if (ChainLength > LongestChain)
                {
                    LongestChain = ChainLength;
                    key = j;
                }
                return key;


            },
                (x) => Interlocked.Add(ref key, x)
            );

I have a feeling I'm not too far from it, famous last words.

Thanks in advance.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your problem is that you don't want to use Parallel.For in this instance because you already have an array (nums) to iterate over, which calls for Parallel.ForEach. However, your array is created with Enumerable.Range and you don't actually use it for anything, so the best way to do it is with AsParallel and LINQ (PLINQ):

public static class CollatzConjexture2
{
    public static int Calculate(int StartIndex, int MaxSequence)
    {
        var nums = Enumerable.Range(StartIndex, MaxSequence);
        return nums.AsParallel()
                    // compute length of chain for each number
                   .Select(n => new { key = n, len = CollatzChainLength(n) })
                    // find longest chain
                   .Aggregate((max, cur) => cur.len > max.len ||
                    // make sure we have lowest key for longest chain
                      max.len == cur.len && cur.key < max.key ? cur : max)
                    // get number that produced longest chain
                   .key;
    }

    private static int CollatzChainLength(Int64 Number)
    {
        int chainLength;
        for (chainLength = 1; Number != 1; chainLength++)
            Number = (Number & 1) == 0 ? Number >> 1 : Number * 3 + 1;
        return chainLength;
    }
}

This method is about twice as fast on my computer as the serial implementation. Also note that I optimized the main loop so that it does the computation inline rather than calling a function and it uses bitwise math instead of multiplying and dividing. This made it about twice as fast again. Compiling it for x64 instead of x86 also made it more than twice as fast.

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When I run this, I don't necessarily get the smallest index that yields the longest Collatz chain (i.e. for 1 to 1500000, the serial method returns 1117065 and the LINQ method 1126015, both of which have a chain length of 528). As I'm just learning LINQ, is there a simple way to modify the .Aggregate call to fix this? –  chezy525 Dec 21 '10 at 18:41
    
I am getting both answers, somehow, when I debug I get (1117065, 1126015) on separate occasions. Ideally, I would like the minimum index. Thanks in advance. –  Seany84 Dec 21 '10 at 19:13
1  
After playing around with this for a bit, I think you just need to change the condition statement in the .Aggregate. i.e. max.len < cur.len should be (max.len < cur.len) || (max.len == cur.len && max.key > cur.key) –  chezy525 Dec 21 '10 at 19:26
    
chezy525: Thanks for bringing that up. It just so happened that I always got 1117065 but of course that was purely luck. –  Gabe Dec 21 '10 at 19:34
    
Top quality answers. Thank you both for the help. LINQ and Parallelisation here I come.. –  Seany84 Dec 23 '10 at 9:37

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