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When writing a Cython wrapper for a C++ library, I've encountered a case where it's not clear how to correctly decide when to delete certain C++ instances.

The C++ library looks something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

class Widget {
    char *name;
    public:
        Widget() : name(strdup("a widget")) {}
        ~Widget() { printf("Widget destruct\n"); }
        void foo() { printf("Widget::foo %s\n", this->name); }
};

class Sprocket {
    private:
        Widget *important;

    public:
        Sprocket(Widget* important) : important(important) {}
        ~Sprocket() { important->foo(); }
};

An important aspect of this library is that the Sprocket destructor uses the Widget* it was given, so the Widget must not be destroyed until after the Sprocket has been.

The Cython wrapper I've written looks like this:

cdef extern from "somelib.h":
    cdef cppclass Widget:
        pass

    cdef cppclass Sprocket:
        Sprocket(Widget*)


cdef class PyWidget:
    cdef Widget *thisptr

    def __init__(self):
        self.thisptr = new Widget()

    def __dealloc__(self):
        print 'PyWidget dealloc'
        del self.thisptr


cdef class PySprocket:
    cdef PyWidget widget
    cdef Sprocket *thisptr

    def __init__(self, PyWidget widget):
        self.widget = widget
        self.thisptr = new Sprocket(self.widget.thisptr)


    def __dealloc__(self):
        print 'PySprocket dealloc with widget', self.widget
        del self.thisptr

After building the Python build like this:

$ cython --cplus somelib.pyx 
$ g++ -I/usr/include/python2.6 -L/usr/lib somelib.cpp -shared -o somelib.so
$

In the trivial case, it appears to work:

$ python -c 'from somelib import PyWidget, PySprocket
spr = PySprocket(PyWidget())
del spr
'
PySprocket dealloc with widget <somelib.PyWidget object at 0xb7537080>
Widget::foo a widget
PyWidget dealloc
Widget destruct
$

The cdef Widget field keeps the PyWidget alive until after PySprocket.__dealloc__ destroys the Sprocket. However, as soon as the Python garbage collected gets involved, the tp_clear function Cython constructs for PySprocket messes this up:

$ python -c 'from somelib import PyWidget, PySprocket
class BadWidget(PyWidget):
    pass
widget = BadWidget()
sprocket = PySprocket(widget)
widget.cycle = sprocket
del widget
del sprocket
'
PyWidget dealloc
Widget destruct
PySprocket dealloc with widget None
Widget::foo ��h�

Since there's a reference cycle, the garbage collector invokes the tp_clear to try to break the cycle. Cython's tp_clear drops all references to Python objects. Only after this happens does PySprocket.__dealloc__ get to run.

Cython documentation warns about __dealloc__ (although it took me a while to learn what conditions it was talking about, since it doesn't go into any detail). So perhaps this approach is entirely invalid.

Can Cython support this use case?

As (what I hope is) a temporary work-around, I've moved to an approach that looks something like this:

cdef class PySprocket:
    cdef void *widget
    cdef Sprocket *thisptr

    def __init__(self, PyWidget widget):
        Py_INCREF(widget)
        self.widget = <void*>widget
        self.thisptr = new Sprocket(self.widget.thisptr)


    def __dealloc__(self):
        del self.thisptr
        Py_DECREF(<object>self.widget)

In other words, hiding the reference from Cython so that it is still valid in __dealloc__, and doing reference counting on it manually.

share|improve this question
1  
string.h and stdio.h are not valid C++ headers; the C++ equivalents are <cstring> and <cstdio>, and you really, really shouldn't be using them anyway. Why would you ever consider denying yourself the power of std::string, especially when performance is obviously not a concern (given that you're doing half the work in Python anyway)? –  Karl Knechtel Dec 21 '10 at 18:18
2  
@Karl: they are valid in C++: D.5 of the standard. –  Steve Jessop Dec 21 '10 at 19:20
1  
@Steve legally but IMHO not morally ;) –  Karl Knechtel Dec 21 '10 at 20:57
2  
The name field was a way to demonstrate there's a problem. I was actually going for a segfault, but only managed to get some garbage data (on my system, at least). I think the char* could be replaced with a std::string without substantively affecting the question. Thanks for the reminder about header names, though. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Dec 21 '10 at 21:17
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1 Answer

cdef extern from "somelib.h":
    cdef cppclass Widget:
        pass

    cdef cppclass Sprocket:
        Sprocket(Widget*)


cdef class PyWidget:
    cdef Widget *thisptr
    cdef set    sprockets

    def __init__(self):
        self.thisptr = new Widget()
        self.sprockets = set()

    def __dealloc__(self):
        print 'PyWidget dealloc'
        #PyWidget knows the sprockets and notifies them on destroy
        sprockets_to_dealloc = self.sprockets.copy()
        #with this solution spr items can call back to detach
        for spr in sprockets_to_dealloc:
          del spr
        del self.thisptr

    def attach(PySprocket spr):
        print 'PySprocket attach'
        self.sprockets.add(spr)

    def detach(PySprocket spr):
        print 'PySprocket detach'
        self.sprockets.remove(spr)

cdef class PySprocket:
    cdef PyWidget widget
    cdef Sprocket *thisptr

    def __init__(self, PyWidget widget):
        self.thisptr = new Sprocket(widget.thisptr)
        #You should be sure here that the widget exists
        widget.attach(self)
        self.widget = widget

    def __dealloc__(self):
        self.widget.detach(self)
        del self.thisptr

I come back a bit later to check what I have wrote, cause I'm quite tired, but here is what matters: The point is that you want to notify Sprockets when destroying Widget, and vice versa.

It is a general solution, can be tuned up.

You have to include error handling also, I have skipped that absolutely. Nothing to do with garbage collector, there was a design problem in your code.

EDIT: these codes are equialent:
A

class BadWidget(PyWidget):
    pass
widget = BadWidget()
sprocket = PySprocket(widget)
widget.cycle = sprocket ###1
del widget ###2
del sprocket

B

class BadWidget(PyWidget):
    pass
widget = BadWidget()
sprocket = PySprocket(widget)
sprocket.widget.cycle = sprocket ###1
del sprocket.widget ###2
del sprocket

###2 will call sprocket.widget.__deallocate__() and it doesn't deallocates sprocket.widget.cycle, so the sprocket will survive the widget

share|improve this answer
1  
I did not test it, but I have used both Python and C++ a lot, and checked the Cython documentation. –  ch0kee Dec 30 '10 at 5:18
1  
Hi, thanks for the suggestion. I tweaked your Cython a little to get it to compile (needed a forward PySprocket declaration, some self parameters were forgotten, and del spr isn't legal) - wish I could share the exact code but it won't fit in this comment box - and re-tried my simple test from the question, with this result: Exception AttributeError: "'NoneType' object has no attribute 'remove'" in <proposed.PySprocket object at 0xb756810c> ignored. There is a similar error for 'copy' as well. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Jan 2 '11 at 0:03
1  
self.sprockets is an object of python set type, it is supported in cython. What self parameters were forgotten ? just mention 1-2 so I can edit my post, I didn't find them. Both of your codes run as expected, you see ? In your second code you inserted a del widget before del sprocket, that makes the difference. –  ch0kee Jan 2 '11 at 8:43
1  
The PyWidget attach and detach methods are missing the self parameter. A step-by-step explanation would be great; I think I already understand what's happening, but perhaps I overlooked something. As regards the "del widget" preceding the "del sprocket" - the objects are in a cycle, so the order of the del should not matter. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Jan 2 '11 at 16:08
1  
Unfortunately this still doesn't work. The problem is that in PySprocket.__dealloc__, self.widget is not guaranteed to be valid and in PyWidget.__dealloc__, neither is self.sprockets. Cython's tp_clear may have already set both attributes to None. This will only happen when there is a reference cycle, since Python only calls tp_clear in that case. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Jan 10 '11 at 14:57
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