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I am trying to call an overloaded method based on the generic type. I've been doing this in C++ without any pain. But I really don't understand why am not able to do this in C# with generics. Can anybody help me how can I achieve this in C# with generics?

class Test<T>
{
    public T Val;

    public void Do(T val)
    {
        Val = val;
        MainClass.Print(Val);
    }
}

class MainClass
{
    public static void Print(UInt16 val)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("UInt16: " + val.ToString());
    }

    public static void Print(UInt32 val)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("UInt32: " + val.ToString());
    }

    public static void Print(UInt64 val)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("UInt64: " + val.ToString());
    }

    public static void Main (string[] args)
    {   
        Test<UInt16> test = new Test<UInt16>();
        test.Do(0);

    }
}
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This example won't compile as Do() requires an argument. In what manner is this not working? Compilation error (other than the above)? Unexpected runtime behavior? –  ThatBlairGuy Dec 21 '10 at 17:53
    
Forgot to pass the value to Do during my edits, now fixed. –  Siva Chandran Dec 22 '10 at 9:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This won't work because C# generics are fundamentally different to C++ templates. .NET generic class instantiations are created at run-time, whereas C++ template instantiations are created at compile-time (as far as I know; my C++ is very rusty). The generic Do<T> method has to know at compile time a single method to call that can be baked into the resulting IL.

The way to accomplish this is to use reflection, or dynamic (new in C#4):

class Test<T>
{
    public T Val;

    public void Do(T val)
    {
        Val = val;
        dynamic dynVal = Val;
        MainClass.Print(dynVal);
    }
}

With dynamic, the method lookup will be at runtime. Note that this is completely separate to generics, and will work equally well in non-generic code.

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I haven't tried this, but I don't think it'll work. Dynamic is really of type object in C# and at compile time it won't know which method to call, since there is no method which takes type object. –  Kevin Dec 21 '10 at 17:59
    
Unless I've forgotten my C++, those generics are also compile-time. At least, I don't recall any mechanism in C++ which would allow a caller to dynamically change the type of the parameters it was passing. –  ThatBlairGuy Dec 21 '10 at 18:00
    
@Kevin: yes, but the method call is replaced with a dynamic lookup mechanism that ends up calling the correct method. The choice of which method to call is put on hold until runtime. –  thecoop Dec 21 '10 at 18:02
    
@ThatBlairGuy: as I've said, my C++ is very rusty. –  thecoop Dec 21 '10 at 18:02
    
@thecoop: Okay, that's cool. Confirmed that it works. –  Chris Lively Dec 21 '10 at 18:12

I might be missing something, but in your code you have:

public void Do(T val)
    {
        Val = val;
        MainClass.Print(Val);
    }

and in you main method you have:

test.Do();  //no parameter provided.
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The problem youre encountering is that C# desn't select the appropriate method based on your type T. You'll have to make a workaound like this:

void Print<T>(T val)
{
  switch(val.GetType())
  {
    case typeof(UInt64):
         Console.WriteLine(...); break;
  }
}
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Oh I'm sorry I didn't test it... –  alex Dec 21 '10 at 18:08
    
I was wrong. ;) –  Chris Lively Dec 21 '10 at 18:18
    
Oh ok. In this case I'll forgive you :) –  alex Dec 21 '10 at 18:34

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