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So I have a generic list, and an oldIndex and a newIndex value.

I want to move the item at oldIndex, to newIndex...as simply as possible.

Any suggestions?

Note

The item should be end up between the items at (newIndex - 1) and newIndex before it was removed.

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Good point zacherates - I've updated the question to clarify –  Richard Everett Jan 16 '09 at 13:29
    
Right you are Garry - I have updated my question again. –  Richard Everett Jan 16 '09 at 13:54
    
You should change the answer you ticked. The one with newIndex-- does not result in the behaviour you said you wanted. –  Miral Jan 31 '14 at 9:05
    
@Miral - which answer do you think should be the accepted one? –  Richard Everett Jan 31 '14 at 11:09
2  
jpierson's. It results in the object that used to be at oldIndex before the move to be at newIndex after the move. This is the least surprising behaviour (and it's what I needed when I was writing some drag'n'drop reordering code). Granted he's talking about ObservableCollection and not a generic List<T>, but it's trivial to simply swap the method calls to get the same result. –  Miral Jan 31 '14 at 21:35

7 Answers 7

up vote 28 down vote accepted

I know you said "generic list" but you didn't specify that you needed to use the List(T) class so here is a shot at something different.

The ObservableCollection(T) class has a Move method that does exactly what you want.

public void Move(int oldIndex, int newIndex)

Underneath it is basically implemented like this.

T item = base[oldIndex];
base.RemoveItem(oldIndex);
base.InsertItem(newIndex, item);

So as you can see the swap method that others have suggested is essentially what the ObservableCollection does in it's own Move method.

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4  
Thanks, this is exactly what I'm looking for! –  Enrico Apr 22 '13 at 11:26
7  
I wonder why this isn't implemented on the List<T> as well, any one to shed some light on this? –  Andreas Jan 17 '14 at 9:47
var item = list[oldIndex];

list.RemoveAt(oldIndex);

if (newIndex > oldIndex) newIndex--; 
// the actual index could have shifted due to the removal

list.Insert(newIndex, item);
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6  
Your solution breaks down if there are two copies of item in the list, with one occurring before oldIndex. You should use RemoveAt to make sure you get the right one. –  Aaron Maenpaa Jan 16 '09 at 12:27
5  
Indeed, sneaky edge case –  Garry Shutler Jan 16 '09 at 12:27
    
@Garry, I'm sorry for deleting your comment on my other answer but since we don't care about where the item on the newIndex goes before the move, in this case, moving is as good as swapping the items. –  bruno conde Jan 16 '09 at 13:04
    
@GarryShutler I can't see how the index could shift if we are removing and then inserting a single item. Decrementing the newIndex actually breaks my test (see my answer below). –  Ben Foster Aug 7 '12 at 10:45
    
@BenFoster If the new index is after the old index then the new index would be one less after the RemoveAt. For example: you want to move list[15] to be between the items at list[25] and list[26]. You remove list[15] so now what was list[25] is now list[24] and what was list[26] is now list[25], so instead of list.Insert(26, item); you would use list.Insert(25, item);. It is possible that the code above is not working for you because of how you calculate which index you wish to use. –  Trisped Oct 3 '12 at 21:30

Simplest way:

list[newIndex] = list[oldIndex];
list.RemoveAt(oldIndex);

EDIT

The question isn't very clear ... Since we don't care where the list[newIndex] item goes I think the simplest way of doing this is as follows (with or without an extension method):

    public static void Move<T>(this List<T> list, int oldIndex, int newIndex)
    {
        T aux = list[newIndex];
        list[newIndex] = list[oldIndex];
        list[oldIndex] = aux;
    }

This solution is the fastest because it doesn't involve list insertions/removals.

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1  
That will overwrite the item at newIndex, not insert. –  Garry Shutler Jan 16 '09 at 12:24
    
True but that's not specified in the question ... –  bruno conde Jan 16 '09 at 12:30
    
@Garry Isn't the end result going to be the same? –  Ozgur Ozcitak Jan 16 '09 at 12:52
2  
No, you'll end up losing the value at newIndex which wouldn't happen if you inserted. –  Garry Shutler Jan 16 '09 at 13:41

List<T>.Remove() and List<T>.RemoveAt() do not return the item that is being removed.

Therefore you have to use this:

var item = list[oldIndex];
list.RemoveAt(oldIndex);
list.Insert(newIndex, item);
share|improve this answer

Something like this:

List<object> l;
l.Insert(newIndex, l[oldIndex]);
if(newIndex <= oldIndex) ++oldIndex;
l.RemoveAt(oldIndex);

EDIT: Taking in to account the index shift, hope its correct. (tks for the comments)

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Sorry I managed to rollback your answer instead of adding a comment. No idea how I managed that. I think I changed it back now. –  Garry Shutler Jan 16 '09 at 12:24
    
However, you don't take into account that the index of the item you want to remove may change due to the insertion. –  Garry Shutler Jan 16 '09 at 12:25
    
Yes, you are right. I was only half seeing the problem. –  Megacan Jan 16 '09 at 12:41

I created an extension method for moving items in a list.

An index should not shift if we are moving an existing item since we are moving an item to an existing index position in the list.

The edge case that @Oliver refers to below (moving an item to the end of the list) would actually cause the tests to fail, but this is by design. To insert a new item at the end of the list we would just call List<T>.Add. list.Move(predicate, list.Count) should fail since this index position does not exist before the move.

In any case, I've created two additional extension methods, MoveToEnd and MoveToBeginning, the source of which can be found here.

/// <summary>
/// Extension methods for <see cref="System.Collections.Generic.List{T}"/>
/// </summary>
public static class ListExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Moves the item matching the <paramref name="itemSelector"/> to the <paramref name="newIndex"/> in a list.
    /// </summary>
    public static void Move<T>(this List<T> list, Predicate<T> itemSelector, int newIndex)
    {
        Ensure.Argument.NotNull(list, "list");
        Ensure.Argument.NotNull(itemSelector, "itemSelector");
        Ensure.Argument.Is(newIndex >= 0, "New index must be greater than or equal to zero.");

        var currentIndex = list.FindIndex(itemSelector);
        Ensure.That<ArgumentException>(currentIndex >= 0, "No item was found that matches the specified selector.");

        // Copy the current item
        var item = list[currentIndex];

        // Remove the item
        list.RemoveAt(currentIndex);

        // Finally add the item at the new index
        list.Insert(newIndex, item);
    }
}

[Subject(typeof(ListExtensions), "Move")]
public class List_Move
{
    static List<int> list;

    public class When_no_matching_item_is_found
    {
        static Exception exception;

        Establish ctx = () => {
            list = new List<int>();
        };

        Because of = ()
            => exception = Catch.Exception(() => list.Move(x => x == 10, 10));

        It Should_throw_an_exception = ()
            => exception.ShouldBeOfType<ArgumentException>();
    }

    public class When_new_index_is_higher
    {
        Establish ctx = () => {
            list = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
        };

        Because of = ()
            => list.Move(x => x == 3, 4); // move 3 to end of list (index 4)

        It Should_be_moved_to_the_specified_index = () =>
            {
                list[0].ShouldEqual(1);
                list[1].ShouldEqual(2);
                list[2].ShouldEqual(4);
                list[3].ShouldEqual(5);
                list[4].ShouldEqual(3);
            };
    }

    public class When_new_index_is_lower
    {
        Establish ctx = () => {
            list = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
        };

        Because of = ()
            => list.Move(x => x == 4, 0); // move 4 to beginning of list (index 0)

        It Should_be_moved_to_the_specified_index = () =>
        {
            list[0].ShouldEqual(4);
            list[1].ShouldEqual(1);
            list[2].ShouldEqual(2);
            list[3].ShouldEqual(3);
            list[4].ShouldEqual(5);
        };
    }
}
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Where is Ensure.Argumentdefined? –  Oliver Aug 7 '12 at 11:21
    
In a normal List<T> you can call Insert(list.Count, element) to place something at the end of the list. So your When_new_index_is_higher should call list.Move(x => x == 3, 5) which actually fails. –  Oliver Aug 7 '12 at 11:38
1  
@Oliver in a normal List<T> I would just call .Add to insert a new item to the end of a list. When moving individual items we never increase the original size of the index since we're only removing a single item and reinserting it. If you click the link in my answer you'll find the code for Ensure.Argument. –  Ben Foster Aug 8 '12 at 9:02
    
You solution expects that the destination index is a position, not between two elements. While this works well for some use cases, it does not work for others. Also, your move does not support moving to the end (as noted by Oliver) but no where in your code do you indicate this constraint. It is also counterintuitive, if I have a list with 20 elements and want to move element 10 to the end, I would expect the Move method to handle this, rather then having to find to save the object reference, remove the object from the list and add the object. –  Trisped Oct 3 '12 at 21:44
    
@Trisped actually if you read my answer, moving an item to the end/beginning of the list is supported. You can see the specs here. Yes my code expects the index to be a valid (existing) position within the list. We are moving items, not inserting them. –  Ben Foster Oct 29 '12 at 12:57

I would expect either:

// Makes sure item is at newIndex after the operation
T item = list[oldIndex];
list.RemoveAt(oldIndex);
list.Insert(newIndex, item);

... or:

// Makes sure relative ordering of newIndex is preserved after the operation, 
// meaning that the item may actually be inserted at newIndex - 1 
T item = list[oldIndex];
list.RemoveAt(oldIndex);
newIndex = (newIndex > oldIndex ? newIndex - 1, newIndex)
list.Insert(newIndex, item);

... would do the trick, but I don't have VS on this machine to check.

share|improve this answer
    
RemoveAt doesn't return the item and you have to be wary of the index shifting due the to removal of an item from the list. –  Garry Shutler Jan 16 '09 at 12:20
    
@Garry You are correct. As for the index shifting, it really depends on whether you want the the item at newIndex after the move or whether you want to preserve the relative ordering of where newIndex was before the RemoveAt. –  Aaron Maenpaa Jan 16 '09 at 12:25
    
If you don't that's really weird as the behaviour will differ depending on whether newIndex is less or greater than oldIndex. That's a bug waiting to happen imo. –  Garry Shutler Jan 16 '09 at 12:26
    
@GarryShutler It depends on the situation. If your interface allows the user to specify the position in the list by index, they will be confused when they tell item 15 to move to 20, but instead it moves to 19. If your interface allows the user to drag an item between to others on the list then it would make sense to decrement newIndex if it is after oldIndex. –  Trisped Oct 3 '12 at 21:47

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