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I'm wanting to parse a string into a nullable int in C#. ie. I want to get back either the int value of the string or null if it can't be parsed.

I was kind of hoping that this would work

int? val = stringVal as int?;

But that won't work, so the way I'm doing it now is I've written this extension method

public static int? ParseNullableInt(this string value)
{
	if (value == null || value.Trim() == string.Empty)
	{
		return null;
	}
	else
	{
		try
		{
			return int.Parse(value);
		}
		catch
		{
			return null;
		}
	}
}

Is there a better way of doing this?

EDIT: Thanks for the TryParse suggestions, I did know about that, but it worked out about the same. I'm more interested in knowing if there is a built-in framework method that will parse directly into a nullable int?

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You can use string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) to get the if line more clearer. –  Özgür Kaplan Feb 29 '12 at 8:36
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16 Answers

up vote 146 down vote accepted

Int32.TryParse is probably a tad easier:

public static int? ToNullableInt32(this string s)
{
    int i;
    if (Int32.TryParse(s, out i)) return i;
    return null;
}

Edit @Glenn Int32.TryParse is "built into the framework". It and Int32.Parse are the way to parse strings to ints.

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40  
one less line: return Int32.TryParse(s, out i) ? i : null; –  Chris Shouts Oct 23 '09 at 13:31
    
I definitely prefer this way to TryParse –  Bent Rasmussen Mar 11 '10 at 15:32
1  
"a" will return null, but it is not int and should throw exception –  ArsenMkrt Jul 19 '11 at 11:37
15  
@Chris, the compiler doesn't like your inline if statement (These types are not compatible: 'int' : 'null'). I had to amend it to: return Int32.TryParse(s, out i)? (int?)i : null; –  death_au Jan 25 '12 at 3:35
2  
Int32 is just an alias to int. I would use int.TryParse to keep the types being used in alignment. If/when int is used to represent a different bit length integer (which has happened), Int32 will not line up with int. –  Richard Collette Nov 26 '12 at 15:39
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Try this:

public static int? ParseNullableInt(this string value)
{
    int intValue;
    if (int.TryParse(value, out intValue))
        return intValue;
    return null;
}
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You can do this in one line, using the conditional operator and the fact that you can cast null to a nullable type (two lines, if you don't have a pre-existing int you can reuse for the output of TryParse):

int tempVal;
int? val = Int32.TryParse(stringVal, out tempVal) ? tempVal : (int?)null;
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2  
You could - but relying on side-effects and order-of-evaluation like that is nasty, when you can make the sequential dependancy obvious by using Matt's syntax. Incidentally, it's handy to use default(int?) for this and similar expressions precisely to avoid the type-inference errors that stem from null's untyped nature without needing to insert casts that may actually execute code. –  Eamon Nerbonne May 31 '10 at 15:38
2  
That depends on your view of the conditional operator, I think. My mental model is that it is pretty much syntactic sugar for the if-else equivalent, in which case my version and Matt's are close to identical, with his being more explicit, mine more cmopact. –  McKenzieG1 Jun 1 '10 at 20:48
8  
There is no order-of-evaluation side-effect here. All steps are explicitly ordered and correct. –  Jon Hanna Mar 22 '11 at 14:30
1  
return int.TryParse(val, out i) ? i : default(int?); –  Bart Dec 11 '13 at 23:10
    
@Bart's "answer" is the best here! –  André Figueiredo Dec 20 '13 at 11:50
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You should never use an exception if you don't have to - the overhead is horrible.

The variations on TryParse solve the problem - if you want to get creative (to make your code look more elegant) you could probably do something with an extension method in 3.5 but the code would be more or less the same.

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Sorry, couldn't resist - had this problem and Google brought me here, but I ended up with this (after all, an if and 2 returns is soo long-winded!):

int? ParseNInt (string val)
{
	int i;
	return int.TryParse (val, out i) ? (int?) i : null;
}

On a more serious note, try not to mix int, which is a C# keyword, with Int32, which is a .NET Framework BCL type - although it works, it just makes code look messy.

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i love this solution! –  Evildonald Jul 27 '10 at 13:43
    
+1 for a two-line solution. While very nice of our colleagues to post other solutions, I think the more comprehensive/generic solutions presented in this thread are overkill. –  TonyG Oct 28 '12 at 22:45
    
Not quite sure this will actually translate into anything that performs better once compiled –  Franklin Nov 5 '13 at 16:15
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I'm more interested in knowing if there is a built-in framework method that will parse directly into a nullable int?

There isn't.

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1  
Would you consider this a direct approach? stackoverflow.com/a/6474962/222748 –  Michael Nov 28 '11 at 23:28
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Using delegates, the following code is able to provide reusability if you find yourself needing the nullable parsing for more than one structure type. I've shown both the .Parse() and .TryParse() versions here.

This is an example usage:

NullableParser.TryParseInt(ViewState["Id"] as string);

And here is the code that gets you there...

public class NullableParser
  {
    public delegate T ParseDelegate<T>(string input) where T : struct;
    public delegate bool TryParseDelegate<T>(string input, out T outtie) where T : struct;
    private static T? Parse<T>(string input, ParseDelegate<T> DelegateTheParse) where T : struct
    {
      if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(input)) return null;
      return DelegateTheParse(input);
    }
    private static T? TryParse<T>(string input, TryParseDelegate<T> DelegateTheTryParse) where T : struct
    {
      T x;
      if (DelegateTheTryParse(input, out x)) return x;
      return null;
    }
    public static int? ParseInt(string input)
    {
      return Parse<int>(input, new ParseDelegate<int>(int.Parse));
    }
    public static int? TryParseInt(string input)
    {
      return TryParse<int>(input, new TryParseDelegate<int>(int.TryParse));
    }
    public static bool? TryParseBool(string input)
    {
      return TryParse<bool>(input, new TryParseDelegate<bool>(bool.TryParse));
    }
    public static DateTime? TryParseDateTime(string input)
    {
      return TryParse<DateTime>(input, new TryParseDelegate<DateTime>(DateTime.TryParse));
    }
  }
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I found and adapted some code for a Generic NullableParser class. The full code is on my blog Nullable TryParse

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404 - not found. it's not a good practice just to give a link –  Dirty-flow Jan 8 '13 at 15:00
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I realise this is an old topic, but can't you simply:

(Nullable<int>)int.Parse(stringVal);

?

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You can, but then you'll get an exception if stringVal is in the wrong format. See the int.Parse documentation: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b3h1hf19.aspx –  Alex Jan 26 '11 at 14:16
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The following should work for any struct type. It is based off code by Matt Manela from MSDN forums. As Murph points out the exception handling could be expensive compared to using the Types dedicated TryParse method.

        public static bool TryParseStruct<T>(this string value, out Nullable<T> result)
            where T: struct 
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
            {
                result = new Nullable<T>();

                return true;
            }

            result = default(T);
            try
            {
                IConvertible convertibleString = (IConvertible)value;
                result = new Nullable<T>((T)convertibleString.ToType(typeof(T), System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture));
            }
            catch(InvalidCastException)
            {
                return false;
            }
            catch (FormatException)
            {
                return false;
            }

           return true;
        }

These were the basic test cases I used.

        string parseOne = "1";
        int? resultOne;
        bool successOne = parseOne.TryParseStruct<int>(out resultOne);
        Assert.IsTrue(successOne);
        Assert.AreEqual(1, resultOne);

        string parseEmpty = string.Empty;
        int? resultEmpty;
        bool successEmpty = parseEmpty.TryParseStruct<int>(out resultEmpty);
        Assert.IsTrue(successEmpty);
        Assert.IsFalse(resultEmpty.HasValue);

        string parseNull = null;
        int? resultNull;
        bool successNull = parseNull.TryParseStruct<int>(out resultNull);
        Assert.IsTrue(successNull);
        Assert.IsFalse(resultNull.HasValue);

        string parseInvalid = "FooBar";
        int? resultInvalid;
        bool successInvalid = parseInvalid.TryParseStruct<int>(out resultInvalid);
        Assert.IsFalse(successInvalid);
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Old topic, but how about:

public static int? ParseToNullableInt(string value)
{
     return String.IsNullOrEmpty(value) ? null : (int.Parse(value) as int?);
}

I like this better as the requriement where to parse null, the TryParse version would not throw an error on e.g. ToNullableInt32(XXX). That may introduce unwanted silent errors.

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That's exactly the point - if the string can't can't be parsed to int, it should return null, not throw an exception. –  svick Mar 29 '11 at 13:25
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I felt I should share mine which is a bit more generic.

Usage:

var result = "123".ParseBy(int.Parse);

var result2 = "123".ParseBy<int>(int.TryParse);

Solution:

public static class NullableParse
{
    public static Nullable<T> ParseBy<T>(this string input, Func<string, T> parser)
        where T : struct
    {
        try
        {
            return parser(input);
        }
        catch (Exception exc)
        {
            return null;
        }
    }

    public delegate bool TryParseDelegate<T>(string input, out T result);

    public static Nullable<T> ParseBy<T>(this string input, TryParseDelegate<T> parser)
        where T : struct
    {
        T t;
        if (parser(input, out t)) return t;
        return null;
    }
}

First version is a slower since it requires a try-catch but it looks cleaner. If it won't be called many times with invalid strings, it is not that important. If performance is an issue, please note that when using TryParse methods, you need to specify the type parameter of ParseBy as it can not be inferred by the compiler. I also had to define a delegate as out keyword can not be used within Func<>, but at least this time compiler does not require an explicit instance.

Finally, you can use it with other structs as well, i.e. decimal, DateTime, Guid, etc.

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I feel my solution is a very clean and nice solution:

public static T? NullableParse<T>(string s) where T : struct
{
    try
    {
        return (T)typeof(T).GetMethod("Parse", new[] {typeof(string)}).Invoke(null, new[] { s });
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return null;
    }
}

This is of course a generic solution which only require that the generics argument has a static method "Parse(string)". This works for numbers, boolean, DateTime, etc.

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Glenn Slaven: I'm more interested in knowing if there is a built-in framework method that will parse directly into a nullable int?

There is this approach that will parse directly to a nullable int (and not just int) if the value is valid like null or empty string, but does throw an exception for invalid values so you will need to catch the exception and return the default value for those situations:

public static T Parse<T>(object value)
{
    try { return (T)System.ComponentModel.TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(T)).ConvertFrom(value.ToString()); }
    catch { return default(T); }
}

This approach can still be used for non-nullable parses as well as nullable:

enum Fruit { Orange, Apple }
var res1 = Parse<Fruit>("Apple");
var res2 = Parse<Fruit?>("Banana");
var res3 = Parse<int?>("100") ?? 5; //use this for non-zero default
var res4 = Parse<Unit>("45%");

NB: There is an IsValid method on the converter you can use instead of capturing the exception (thrown exceptions does result in unnecessary overhead if expected). Unfortunately it only works since .NET 4 but there's still an issue where it doesn't check your locale when validating correct DateTime formats, see bug 93559.

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You can forget all other answers - there is a great generic solution: http://cleansharp.de/wordpress/2011/05/generischer-typeconverter/

This allows you to write very clean code like this:

string value = null;
int? x = value.ConvertOrDefault();

and also:

object obj = 1;  

string value = null;
int x = 5;
if (value.TryConvert(out x))
    Console.WriteLine("TryConvert example: " + x); 

bool boolean = "false".ConvertOrDefault();
bool? nullableBoolean = "".ConvertOrDefault();
int integer = obj.ConvertOrDefault();
int negativeInteger = "-12123".ConvertOrDefault();
int? nullableInteger = value.ConvertOrDefault();
MyEnum enumValue = "SecondValue".ConvertOrDefault();

MyObjectBase myObject = new MyObjectClassA();
MyObjectClassA myObjectClassA = myObject.ConvertOrDefault();
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This is indeed very useful. In my opinion this should be in the standard c# libraries because conversions are very common in every program ;) –  BigChief Apr 28 '13 at 16:52
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This solution is generic without reflection overhead.

public static Nullable<T> ParseNullable<T>(string s, Func<string, T> parser) where T : struct
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s) || string.IsNullOrEmpty(s.Trim())) return null;
    else return parser(s);
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Nullable<int> i = ParseNullable("-1", int.Parse);
    Nullable<float> dt = ParseNullable("3.14", float.Parse);
}
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