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PHP: Get name of variable passed as argument
How to get a variable name as a string in PHP?

If I have

$abc = '123';

function write($var){

}

How would I inside write find out that the variable now represented by $var was called $abc?

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marked as duplicate by Gordon, ircmaxell, mario, Michael Mrozek, Simone Carletti Dec 22 '10 at 21:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
Even if it was really represented in your code, there is no way anyway. forget it. –  Your Common Sense Dec 21 '10 at 20:12
1  
You can't. Only the value is passed to the function. –  Pekka 웃 Dec 21 '10 at 20:12
3  
Why do you want to do this? Chances are that there is an easier or more appropriate method (or you just shouldn't do it to begin with)... –  ircmaxell Dec 21 '10 at 20:13
2  
possible duplicate of How to get a variable name as a string in PHP? (the one that was duplicated in @Gordon's post) –  ircmaxell Dec 21 '10 at 20:16
1  
@Jonah that's because ppl are too lazy to search nowadays. I am sure there is a number of additional duplicates –  Gordon Dec 21 '10 at 20:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's not possible. Even pass-by-reference won't help you. You'll have to pass the name as a second argument.

But what you have asked is most assuredly not a good solution to your problem.

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3  
technically it's possible, but still not a good idea. –  zzzzBov Dec 21 '10 at 20:19

You can not get the variable name, but if you want it for debugging, then you can use PHP's built-in debug_backtrace(), and I recommend to take a look on Xdebug as well.

With this function, you can get some data on the caller, including the file and line number, so you can look up that line manualy after running the script:

function debug_caller_data()
{
    $backtrace = debug_backtrace();

    if (count($backtrace) > 2)
        return $backtrace[count($backtrace)-2];
    elseif (count($backtrace) > 1)
        return $backtrace[count($backtrace)-1];
    else
        return false;
}

Full example:

<?php

function debug_caller_data()
{
    $backtrace = debug_backtrace();

    if (count($backtrace) > 2)
        return $backtrace[count($backtrace)-2];
    elseif (count($backtrace) > 1)
        return $backtrace[count($backtrace)-1];
    else
        return false;
}

function write($var)
{
    var_dump(debug_caller_data());
}


function caller_function()
{
    $abc = '123';
    write($abc);
}

$abc = '123';
write($abc);

caller_function();
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Surely, this is not possible without creating a PHP extension for it.

You certainly don't want to rely on that, especially in a function. A function should not be able to operate outside its own scope (except for globals, but I hate them).

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This answer makes some assumptions:

  1. that it works (i haven't tested it)
  2. that you're only passing in variables declared globally
  3. that the variable being passed is unique or an object.

Note that the function uses a pass by reference. I'm assuming it will be necessary for exact comparison of objects.

function write(&$var)
{
  $varname = null;
  foreach ($GLOBALS as $name => $val)
  {
    if ($val === $var)
    {
      $varname = $name;
      break;
    }
  }
}

Is there a particular reason you need the var's name? There is probably a better solution.

† Added emphasis to assumption #3

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2  
This won't work. === does not check for a reference, it checks for value and type. So, $a = 1; $b = &$a; $c = 1, then $a === $c is also true. –  netcoder Dec 21 '10 at 20:21
    
@netcoder maybe i should have emphasized point number 3 on the assumptions. The variable being passed has to be unique. –  zzzzBov Dec 21 '10 at 20:35
    
this answer is the same as mine, except i passed by reference (not necessary). –  zzzzBov Dec 21 '10 at 20:41

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