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I have this PHP one dimensional array:

  Array
    (
        [Female--N] => 11
        [Male--N] => 11
        [Humans--N] => 11
        [Adult--N] => 8
        [Adolescent--N] => 8
        [Reaction Time-physiology--N] => 6
        [Acoustic Stimulation-methods--N] => 6
        [Schizophrenia-genetics--Y] => 5
        [Motion Perception--N] => 3
    )

And i want a new array from this that looks like (i think this tow-dimensional..?):

Array
        (
            [Female][N] => 11
            [Male][N] => 11
            [Humans][N] => 11
            [Adult][N] => 8
            [Adolescent][N] => 8
            [Reaction Time-physiology][N] => 6
            [Acoustic Stimulation-methods][N] => 6
            [Schizophrenia-genetics][Y] => 5
            [Motion Perception][N] => 3
        )

Can i use split method on key elements?

Little bit harder... i also need to split on the single '_' underscore, i did this to prevent the columns getting mixed up... But the example below doesn't do the job right...

$new_array = array();
foreach($MeshtagsArray as $key => $value) {
    $parts = explode('__', $key, 2);
    $parts2 = explode('_', $key, 2);
    $new_array[] = array(
        'discriptor' => $parts[0],
    'qualifier' => $parts2[1],
        'major' => $parts[1],
        '#occurence' => $value
    );

So the output should be something like:

[0] => Array
        (
            [discriptor] => Female
            [qualifier] => 
            [major] => N
            [#occurence] => 11
........
[5] => Array
        (
            [discriptor] => Reaction Time
            [qualifier] => physiology
            [major] => N
            [#occurence] => 6

Best regards, Thijs

share|improve this question
    
You mean split on the single dash, not underscore, right? –  Stephen Dec 21 '10 at 21:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

UPDATED

$new_array = array();
foreach($old_array as $key => $value) {
    $parts1 = explode('--', $key, 2);
    $parts2 = explode('-', $parts1[0], 2);
    $new_array[] = array(
        'descriptor' => $parts2[0],
        'qualifier' => count($parts2) > 1 ? $parts2[1] : '',
        'major' => $parts1[1],
        '#occurence' => $value
    );
}

$new_array will now be a numerically indexed, multidimensional array. Each top level key will contain an associative array of the elements you require.

In the future, feel free to explain the entire problem from the beginning, that way we can all better help you!

Explanation

According to php.net:

array explode ( string $delimiter , string $string [, int $limit ] )

Returns an array of strings, each of which is a substring of string formed by splitting it on boundaries formed by the string delimiter.

The array in your problem is associative; it's keys are strings. This makes it is a simple matter to iterate over the array with foreach and explode the keys into parts. I use a limit parameter to ensure that there will be no more than two parts.

Also, since one delimiter is a doubled version of the other, we have to first explode on the double -- delimiter, and then explode on the single - delimiter.

Technically, we could have used a single explode—with no limit parameter—and the single - delimiter. Then we could have inferred which element part belonged where. However, sometimes there is no qualifier. To get around this problem, I've used two explodes, and a ternary operator that counts the returned number of elements from the second explode.

share|improve this answer
    
Updated to fix a syntax error in the example. –  Stephen Dec 21 '10 at 21:20
    
Thanks!! I editted my question... because i forgot to say there was need of another explode. I think it is alot more difficult with the extra explode! –  Thijs Dec 21 '10 at 21:51
    
Added a ternary to fix the fact that some of the keys do not contain a qualifier –  Stephen Dec 21 '10 at 22:03
    
Thank!! I will do in the future! Regards, Thijs –  Thijs Dec 21 '10 at 22:04

Try this function:

function convertArray($array)
{
    $return = array();
    foreach ($array as $key=>$value)
    {
        $exploded = explode('--', $key);
        $return[$exploded[0]][$exploded[1]] = $value;
    }

    return $return;
}
share|improve this answer

Assuming you are splitting on -- and you want a two dimensional array, try the following.

foreach ($the_array as $key => $value) {
    // split key into new indexes
    $indexes = explode('--', $key);

    if (count($indexes) == 2) {
        // create new dimension and set value
        $the_array[$indexes[0]][$indexes[1]] = $value;

        // remove old index
        unset($the_array[$key]);
    }
}

Note: This converts on the original array and ensures the key contains --

share|improve this answer
    
This will fail if the key contains two sets of -- –  Stephen Dec 21 '10 at 20:34
    
I am a bit confused... it works... so that's cool, but is a two-dimensional array the same as a data table with 3 columns? And if not, how do i make an array that consist of 3 columns? I need to put the data: [Female][N] => 11 in a table so it looks like: subject:"Female", Major:"N", #occurence "11". Regards! –  Thijs Dec 21 '10 at 21:12
    
It never does contain two sets of --, but it is good mentioning! –  Thijs Dec 21 '10 at 21:17

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