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I tried to write the program in Haskell that will take a string of integer numbers delimitated by comma, convert it to list of integer numbers and increment each number by 1.

For example "1,2,-5,-23,15" -> [2,3,-4,-22,16]

Below is the resulting program

import Data.List

main :: IO ()
main = do
  n <- return 1
  putStrLn . show . map (+1) . map toInt . splitByDelimiter delimiter
    $ getList n

getList :: Int -> String
getList n = foldr (++) [] . intersperse [delimiter] $ replicate n inputStr

delimiter = ','

inputStr = "1,2,-5,-23,15"

splitByDelimiter :: Char -> String -> [String]
splitByDelimiter _ "" = []
splitByDelimiter delimiter list =
  map (takeWhile (/= delimiter) . tail)
    (filter (isPrefixOf [delimiter])
       (tails
           (delimiter : list)))

toInt :: String -> Int
toInt = read

The most hard part for me was programming of function splitByDelimiter that take a String and return list of Strings

"1,2,-5,-23,15" -> ["1","2","-5","-23","15"]

Thought it is working, I am not happy with the way it is written. There are a lot of parentheses, so it looks Lisp like. Also the algorithm is somewhat artificial:

  1. Prepend delimiter to beginning of string ",1,2,-5,-23,15"

  2. Generate list of all tails [",1,2,-5,-23,15", "1,2,-5,-23,15", ",2,-5,-23,15", .... ]

  3. Filter and left only strings that begins with delimiter [",1,2,-5,-23,15", ",2,-5,-23,15", .... ]

  4. Drop first delimiter and take symbols until next delimiter will be met ["1", "2", .... ]

So the questions are:

How I can improve function splitByDelimiter?

Can I remove prepend and drop of delimiter and make direct split of string?

How I can rewrite the function so there will be less parentheses?

May be I miss something and there are already standard function with this functionality?

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foldr (++) [] is otherwise known as concat, putStrLn . show is otherwise known as print. Also, n <- return 1 is a little odd; you can just do let n = 1 and avoid wrapping and unwrapping the monad. –  pat Feb 27 '13 at 2:36
    
possible duplicate of How to split a string in Haskell? –  Norman Ramsey Jul 2 at 15:39
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6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Doesn't Data.List.Split.splitOn do this?

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4  
Whereas this package is not part of the basic install (Haskell Platform), I think it tends to get overlooked. –  Daniel Pratt Dec 21 '10 at 21:27
    
Thank you. It does exactly what I need. –  sign Dec 21 '10 at 21:33
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splitBy delimiter = foldr f [[]] 
            where f c l@(x:xs) | c == delimiter = []:l
                             | otherwise = (c:x):xs
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This is brilliant; it took me way too long to understand how it works, but I love it. –  yzb3 Nov 7 '13 at 19:25
    
Doesn't work for empty strings, though, i.e. it evaluates to [""] rather than []. –  fotNelton Jan 8 at 7:15
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This is a bit of a hack, but heck, it works.

yourFunc str = map (+1) $ read ("[" ++ str ++ "]")

Here is a non-hack version using unfoldr:

import Data.List
import Control.Arrow(second)

-- break' is like break but removes the
-- delimiter from the rest string
break' d = second (drop 1) . break d

split :: String -> Maybe (String,String)
split [] = Nothing
split xs = Just . break' (==',') $ xs

yourFunc :: String -> [Int]
yourFunc = map ((+1) . read) . unfoldr split
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This is a good point of view. I like the way how unfoldr is used here. –  sign Dec 21 '10 at 22:19
    
Your split is faster than splitOn by 43ns on my comp in ghci :) –  CoR Jul 19 '12 at 7:10
    
This implementation of split function works differently than you would expect - it doesn't properly split strings with commas at the end - one "" is missing. If you want to make sure that a split function is 100% functional, it should be reversible by interspersing with the same delimiter for all permutations of a delimited string, eg. "a,b,c". –  yzb3 Nov 7 '13 at 19:37
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Just for fun, here is how you could create a simple parser with Parsec:

module Main where

import Control.Applicative hiding (many)
import Text.Parsec
import Text.Parsec.String

line :: Parser [Int]
line = number `sepBy` (char ',' *> spaces)

number = read <$> many digit

One advantage is that it's easily create a parser which is flexible in what it will accept:

*Main Text.Parsec Text.Parsec.Token> :load "/home/mikste/programming/Temp.hs"
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( /home/mikste/programming/Temp.hs, interpreted )
Ok, modules loaded: Main.
*Main Text.Parsec Text.Parsec.Token> parse line "" "1, 2, 3"
Right [1,2,3]
*Main Text.Parsec Text.Parsec.Token> parse line "" "10,2703,   5, 3"
Right [10,2703,5,3]
*Main Text.Parsec Text.Parsec.Token> 
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This is application of HaskellElephant's answer to original question with minor changes

splitByDelimiter :: Char -> String -> [String]
splitByDelimiter = unfoldr . splitSingle

splitSingle :: Char -> String -> Maybe (String,String)
splitSingle _ [] = Nothing
splitSingle delimiter xs =
  let (ys, zs) = break (== delimiter) xs in
  Just (ys, drop 1 zs)

Where the function splitSingle split the list in two substrings by first delimiter.

For example: "1,2,-5,-23,15" -> Just ("1", "2,-5,-23,15")

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splitBy del str = helper del str []   
    where 
        helper _ [] acc = let acc0 = reverse acc in [acc0] 
        helper del (x:xs) acc   
            | x==del    = let acc0 = reverse acc in acc0 : helper del xs []  
            | otherwise = let acc0 = x : acc     in helper del xs acc0 
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